Barneys and TopShop Look Good, Do Good

TopShop's latest line isn't by a supermodel or a designer - instead it's made in collaboration with People Tree, a British label that uses organic co
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TopShop's latest line isn't by a supermodel or a designer - instead it's made in collaboration with People Tree, a British label that uses organic co
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TopShop's latest line isn't by a supermodel or a designer - instead it's made in collaboration with People Tree, a British label that uses organic cotton and Fair Trade practices with all of their factories and artisans. The six-piece line has a tunic, a bubble dress, and a geometric print top, all available on the TopShop website starting on February 26. Meanwhile, Barneys announced today that it plans to feature eco-friendly products in every one of its departments, with Julie Gilhart telling WWD, "This isn't a trend - a trend is something that dies. This is a movement." It starts this month with a new Loomstate for Barneys collection and continues all the way through Christmas, when Simon Doonan stuffs the windows with recycled materials and as much "green" product as Barney's can allow (plus some organic inspired characters, like Rudolph the Recycled Reindeer, at left). Our one complaint is similar to our Whole Foods issue: Loomstate clothes are expensive (the cheapest at Barneys will be $120), and not everyone can balance the green in their wallets with the green on the planet. Only when the eco movement becomes affordable will everyone embrace it, so challenge to H&M: Where's your Free Trade line?