Will You Wear a Face?

Watching the Spring Lanvin show stomp down the catwalk, I whispered, "are you kidding me?" a little too loud. I got glares, but I stand by my outburst
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Watching the Spring Lanvin show stomp down the catwalk, I whispered, "are you kidding me?" a little too loud. I got glares, but I stand by my outburst
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Watching the Spring Lanvin show stomp down the catwalk, I whispered, "are you kidding me?" a little too loud. I got glares, but I stand by my outburst. Here's why: It seems incredibly hard for normal woman to wear a face on her dress, especially a giant blow up face of a movie star, a pop star, or a model. Great clothes should illuminate the women wearing them, while bringing that woman into a greater context of ideas, environment, beauty - that's what's happening when you see a gown on the runway and you gasp. Putting a woman in a dress with a giant face on it - well, you're not looking at the girl anymore. You're looking at the face, and probably comparing it to the face of the wearer. Unless she is Doutzen on the cover of Paris Vogue in that dress, it could be a problem. Clothing with face-prints may be the fashion equivalent of Avenue Q, the play where humans are visible onstage, but everyone is looking at their puppets instead. And the Lanvin dress isn't the only face in stores. Urban Outfitters has The Edie dress, with a giant film print of Ms. Sedgewick's face around the bodice. Heatherette has gowns with Judy Garland on the front. The new Mulberry t-shirts from Julie Verhoeven also have fantastical faces printed across them - Can it ever work?