Can Zara Survive Without Stars?

US Weekly may have just produced a "Paris Free" issue, but Zara swears its business is always void of Paris... and Nicole, and Lindsay, and anyone el
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US Weekly may have just produced a "Paris Free" issue, but Zara swears its business is always void of Paris... and Nicole, and Lindsay, and anyone el
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US Weekly may have just produced a "Paris Free" issue, but Zara swears its business is always void of Paris... and Nicole, and Lindsay, and anyone else you've never met but still think you know. The store tells the Washington Post that its secret for success is from runways, not red carpets, and copying catwalk trends at record pace. In a bizarre interview, a Zara executive who refuses to go on record takes the reporter inside the Zara factory, which is so large, employees ride bicycles inside. The exec swears that keeping their production in Spain - where Zara is based - allows the designers to work faster than H&M and TopShop, which means the clothes look more current. But sticking to runway style could have a down side: The clothes at Zara are sometimes quite conceptual, and always cut close to the body. That makes it hard for women without textbook proportions to pull them off, which undoubtedly slices sales (definitely for us). Also, anyone who's ever lived in Europe knows the clothes at Zara are way better there, which leads to another question: Are American runway trends less exciting than European ones, or does the Spanish company just think we're not as cool - maybe because we're slaves to their arch enemy, celebrity worship?