The Noki Show: Do Subcultures Matter?

"I’m not sure or clear how the various English subcultures can reach beyond their followers. And I’m not all that interested. Somehow I’m more intere
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"I’m not sure or clear how the various English subcultures can reach beyond their followers. And I’m not all that interested. Somehow I’m more intere
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"I’m not sure or clear how the various English subcultures can reach beyond their followers. And I’m not all that interested. Somehow I’m more interested in form and effort." - Cathy Horyn, this morning.

Meanwhile: Last night, Henry Holland showed a collection he hopes is commercially viable. It's based on his past idea of mixing the essence of Club Kid with the bottom line of Business - the real reason, I think, why people want to push him with Warhol. Ten minutes after Henry, on the same runway, an artist named J.J. Hudson showed a collection called Noki that he knows (he must know) may not sell. It's based on a seething beauty we've seen on the streets here, a punk residue that seeps into anarchy, pride, and lots of glitter. There's a connection between these two designers, as they seem to come from the same place - the "Look At Me/ Get Away From Me" idea of kids who love attention, but also love and fiercely cling to their own thing. They come from the kids and the streets and the clubs, but they're going different places. Whether one of those places is a position of influence, beyond a sub-culture, beyond a country - I'm still really interested in that, but I'm just as dying to know if Noki can actually build a dress. One more thing: J.J. Hudson, the designer, is a former veejay for MTV. His show, like Henry's, was sponsored by TopShop.

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Busted Image

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