"She Could Be a Farmer in Those Clothes!"

It's fun when "serious" media discovers things that women have always known. Today's Wall Street Journal is a great example - their piece on "Fashion
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It's fun when "serious" media discovers things that women have always known. Today's Wall Street Journal is a great example - their piece on "Fashion
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It's fun when "serious" media discovers things that women have always known. Today's Wall Street Journal is a great example - their piece on "Fashion Bullies" highlights the shocking truth that girls get attacked for their wardrobes at school. The piece decides that "fashion bullying is happening at younger and younger ages," citing children's clothing from Chloe and Dior as potential catalysts for attack. But really, who doesn't remember getting sludged by a fifth-grade friend for wearing a party dress to class? Maybe the most interesting part of the piece is that they don't cover girls who dress themselves in wild clothes - it's all about mothers who want fashionable daughters, and the backlash it creates in classrooms. The story opens with a 5th grader in Dolce & Gabbana, and includes quotes from a distraught Canadian mother whose 8th grader won't wear pink because of hallway taunts. Her mom's response? "Pink looks wonderful on her -- she's a blonde -- and she looks really good in it." It's hard to take an article seriously when it's not about girls and their self expression or even their appearance - it's about their moms' fashion fantasies getting played out in the juniors aisle. But yes, this one time we wore our father's cableknit sweater as a dress to class (in 7th grade) with tights, a belt, huge hiking boots, and a plaid shirt underneath. We thought we looked just like Julie Delpy in W but the girls in our class thought... well, they thought we looked like shit, and made us know it in every single hallway. It scarred us for the rest of our life, and is probably the reason we work in fashion today. So maybe there's a good side to all of this... but it's not the idea that moms buy $400 jeans for their 12-year-olds.