"So you admit it. You think you're really pretty."

Yesterday in the office, we talked about Doutzen Kroes, and why most girls don't seem to love her the way they dig Coco, Gemma, and Stam. We decided i
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Yesterday in the office, we talked about Doutzen Kroes, and why most girls don't seem to love her the way they dig Coco, Gemma, and Stam. We decided i
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Yesterday in the office, we talked about Doutzen Kroes, and why most girls don't seem to love her the way they dig Coco, Gemma, and Stam. We decided it was due to one odd fact: Doutzen sent her own photos into the Dutch modeling agency Paparazzi, while the rest of the girls were "discovered" at concerts, or pushed into modeling by their friends. And for some reason, this bothers us. But why? Nobody argues when J. Lo says she can dance or Alicia Keys says she can sing. But girls aren't allowed to admit they're beautiful, unless they're the adolescent suffering kind on Oprah - certainly not if they're adults whose entire job is to be pretty. Just look at the Vogue story we dug up from 1993, where only Naomi Campbell admits her body is perfect, while Cindy, Christy, and Linda all argue their flaws. In the fashion industry, acting as if you're unaware of your own beauty is obviously important for creating the right not-trying image. How many times has a model/actress bio read something like, “Her mother secretly sent in her photo" [Mariacarla] or “She tagged along to her best friend’s audition, but left after winning the casting agents’ hearts” [Gemma]? We don't think everyone should sprint around, reminding their friends of how gorgeous they are. But still, isn't it strange that saying you're pretty has become a taboo?