Would You Wear Cheap Heels?

Alison is thrilled with the The Hollywould for Target line, available until December 16th. We love designer Holly Dunlap, but the line brings up a qu
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Alison is thrilled with the The Hollywould for Target line, available until December 16th. We love designer Holly Dunlap, but the line brings up a qu
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Alison is thrilled with the The Hollywould for Target line, available until December 16th. We love designer Holly Dunlap, but the line brings up a question we've been meaning to pose: Do cheap heels really feel worse on your feet than costly ones? A primer before the storm: Several years ago, when Sarah Jessica reigned supreme and crushes of chicks felt they couldn't be real women without $500 shoes, Marina Rust wrote an article for Vogue. It detailed her workouts with a "foot" trainer, who'd designed a Manhattan program specifically for heel-wearing women. It had quotes from designers and doctors about how expensive shoes were the only healthy way to get height. It was extremely well told, and of course very Vogue, but it's planted the lingering questions of extreme cost and comfort ever since. Meanwhile, as shoes get more expensive (to the point where Balenciaga's lego footwear costs more than our rent, and we live in a nice apartment), the cheap and chic phenomenon moves down to footwear. Forever 21 has $20 Mary Janes. Steve Madden is going for Miu Miu's leftovers. Aldo is something of a wunderstore. But can you actually make it through a whole day in $30 heels? Which ones? (For the record, the only heels we can handle are this pair of Marc Jacobs Spring '07 clompers with plastic soles. Otherwise, it's Prada patent flats and Converse Chuck Taylors with everything).