"Do You Prefer Fashion Victim, or Ensembly Challenged?"

Let it be said from the start, with the exception of Project Runway, we practically loathe reality TV. But every once in a while we do indulge in Wha
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Let it be said from the start, with the exception of Project Runway, we practically loathe reality TV. But every once in a while we do indulge in Wha
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Let it be said from the start, with the exception of Project Runway, we practically loathe reality TV. But every once in a while we do indulge in What Not To Wear. What can we say? We live for makeovers. We're just not totally convinced that, much like ANTM, anything actually changes after the show. The episodes usually go: Stacey and Clinton, the hosts of What Not To Wear, barge into someone's bedroom and throw away everything they own. They announce rules about what they can buy, and send them around Manhattan to sulk over the impossible task of suddenly acquiring style. The advice? Stacey demands the fashion victims buy color and bold prints, damning every neutral garment in sight. Meanwhile, most people on the show need a new professional look - which might demand neutrality. You never get the sense that any of the trite advice resonates with the "victims" anyway. Without Tim Gunn standing beside the closet every morning, you know they'll return to baggy clothes and brassy hair, except now they might be recognized as a "fashion victim" from a reality show. The newer versions, How Do I Look? and Tim Gunn's Guide to Style, aren't much better. In fact, none of the shows, including What Not to Wear, seem to have much success at all - so why do they keep producing new ones?