Hemlines Still High, Stocks Not So Much

A much-discussed theory this week is whether the runway's hemlines can predict an upcoming recession. The saying goes, if dresses and skirts get lon
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A much-discussed theory this week is whether the runway's hemlines can predict an upcoming recession. The saying goes, if dresses and skirts get lon
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A much-discussed theory this week is whether the runway's hemlines can predict an upcoming recession. The saying goes, if dresses and skirts get longer, the economy is getting worse. It stems from a period in the '20s, when short skirts revealed expensive silk stockings, and long skirts disguised cheaper wool ones. Now it's thought by some (including Faran's dad, an econ guy) that using more fabric spurs and encourages more spending within the entire industry, and you start to see long dresses when people get worried about sales. We did a little obsessive check on Style.com and found that while designers geared to older luxury shoppers - Marc, Donna, Vera - did feature longer silhouettes, their secondary lines - Marc by, DKNY, and Vera Lavender - all had pretty short skirts. Check out DKNY's red scorcher at left. Other young brands - Sass & Bide, Anna Sui, Karen Walker, Charlotte Ronson - also had an a-line sheath shape happening, which means not everyone is surrendering to the grungy or silky long skirts that Erin Fetherston seemed to favor this season. But does it mean anything for the stock market? We're not sure - let's see how Prada's IPO does once it's been public for a little bit.