Explain: Total Looks

The first thing we do when we get a crisp, new magazine is flip straight to the spreads. We're always curious to see how the season's most-wanted acce
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The first thing we do when we get a crisp, new magazine is flip straight to the spreads. We're always curious to see how the season's most-wanted acce
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The first thing we do when we get a crisp, new magazine is flip straight to the spreads. We're always curious to see how the season's most-wanted accessories were styled with the advertisers' best picks, and which models look best in otherwise impossible designs. So we're always a little disappointed when we flip 200+ pages in just to find a gray or white backdrop and a model doing Frankenstein-esque poses wearing looks that are head-to-toe from a single designer. We can't imagine it's an issue of not being able to hire a stylist - plenty of young kids would kill to do it for free and, in fact, we see this most often in the biggest magazines that have the biggest budgets to go with the biggest rolodexes. We think we get the stark background - there are no distractions leaving you only to really examine the clothes. But shooting looks that were shown almost exactly as-is during Fashion Week? Which we've all already seen? And which anyone who missed the shows could see for themselves, along with detail shots, on Style.com for free? We don't think stylists should pass up the chance to tell a cool story with an even cooler background when they have the best clothes in the business just a couple e-mails away. So is there something we're not getting here? Or is it likely that these shoots are done last-minute and on the fly? Explain!