Adventures in Copyrights: Why We Still Do It

And now, a note from Faran... Last weekend, my mom asked why I was so obsessed with knockoffs. "We get it," she said, "Forever 21 copies stuff. Now
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And now, a note from Faran... Last weekend, my mom asked why I was so obsessed with knockoffs. "We get it," she said, "Forever 21 copies stuff. Now
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And now, a note from Faran... Last weekend, my mom asked why I was so obsessed with knockoffs. "We get it," she said, "Forever 21 copies stuff. Now what?" I know some of you share the same attitude, but let me try and give you a window into ours. We still think Adventures in Copyrights is a sustainable resource, in a matter of speaking. Here's why: 1. Because we're rooting for young designers, and a knockoff can mean the difference between making money and going bankrupt. Yeah, we notice when Anna Sui and Balenciaga get copied, and it's pretty outrageous, but we really fume when Vena Cava, Shipley + Halmos, or Chris Benz get played. (In fact, we're wondering if rampant knocking-off had anything to do with Jane Mayle's decision to close shop citing the "out of control" and "ever-accelerating" fashion system.) They're in a very costly business and barely breaking even (if that), and dependent on every single sale. If even one girl buys the knockoff instead of the original, those kids could lose the funding for another season. Yeah, that's business, but it also sucks, and we'd like you to be aware of it. 2. Because knockoffs are made in poor conditions. Sweatshops are rampant with many brands, but Forever 21 and Canal Street vendors are constantly called out on harmful working conditions. Bad fashion karma isn't worth much. 3. Because fast fashion is shitty for the environment. Factories + synthetic materials + clothes you throw away after like two weeks = pollution. Buying fast fashion is a quick high, and a direct route to a landfill. Topshop, Target, Converse, Keds, Gap and H&M have addressed this, making a portion of their clothes with fair trade cotton and eco-friendly dyes and materials. Many of them also make stuff that lasts longer - hence those Topshop dresses from 2002 and Luella for Target stuff from 2004 that still kick around people's closets. Cheap clothes = great. Throwaway clothes = not great. 4. Because we have hope. Hope clothes can be cheaper and more responsibly made. Hope that if we keep hammering at it, executives will start asking the right questions. And hope that at the very least, you like Adventures in Copyrights because it's really funny to see Lego shoes from like, eight different brands. Honestly, how many of you were going to wear Lego shoes to begin with? Love you guys. xoxo F.