Would You Wear A Knock-Off?

Story time: On Saturday, I met a few friends for drinks - one of whom showed up in that Forever 21 Mondrian rip-off and a pair of Bakers' Tribute to Y
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Story time: On Saturday, I met a few friends for drinks - one of whom showed up in that Forever 21 Mondrian rip-off and a pair of Bakers' Tribute to Y
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Story time: On Saturday, I met a few friends for drinks - one of whom showed up in that Forever 21 Mondrian rip-off and a pair of Bakers' Tribute to YSL. Since she's a good friend of mine, I asked her if she was familiar with the origins of her outfit. She responded, "Oh yeah, I know. I mean, it's not like I can afford the originals, so I just got these instead." I winced. Such an irrelevant excuse and yet kept in a holster. But the thing is, my friend is really cool and really into fashion. Definitely not someone you'd expected to show up sporting an F21 knockoff and an "I know' smirk. (I previously, and naively, thought that knock-offs were normally purchased when the shopper just didn't realize she was coveting a copy.) She couldn't really tell me why she bought it, other than that the fakes were so exact that only someone who spots fakes for a living could have told the difference. The finer points, in her mind, were moot. Apparently, a lot more people buy knock-offs than I realized. I've always thought that if you wanted say, a Balenciaga blazer, but couldn't muster the cash, then you could find a fitted vintage suit coat and wear that instead. Inspiration. Not theft. But, apparently, when the copy's close rather than butchered, the ethical question goes out the window and people leave their apartments carrying F21 Motorcycles. So, if a knock-off was good enough, would you wear it? Or would you just save your change - or better, get creative? --KYLE HAYES