That Dress is a Full On Monet

So, I've been shopping a lot lately. I'm doing my part to stimulate our poor economy, obviously trying to ignore the fact that I should probably be fu
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So, I've been shopping a lot lately. I'm doing my part to stimulate our poor economy, obviously trying to ignore the fact that I should probably be fu
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So, I've been shopping a lot lately. I'm doing my part to stimulate our poor economy, obviously trying to ignore the fact that I should probably be funneling my extra pennies elsewhere, but I'm also going through post-Paris depression, so it's ok. Anyway, I've been noticing a lot of what Hayley calls, "Trompe-l'œil, but for clothes." Like an Elizabeth & James blazer that comes with the sleeves pre-ruched and an Alexander Wang dress that's supposed to make people think you're wearing a t-shirt tucked into a skirt. There was a grey knit tank at Otte that came with a scarf sewn onto the neck, which really confused me, and a vest attached to the inside of a blazer somewhere I don't remember. I can't, for the life of me, understand the point of this. I understand the initial thought of, "Hey, it might be easier if I don't have to worry about the styling details myself." But what if it's cold and you want to pull your sleeves down, (even though I always wear mine up, too)? Or what if you want to wear that t-shirt with your jeans instead of the skirt it's sewn onto? And what if you want to wear the tank top but it's 75 degrees outside and you don't need a scarf? Wouldn't it be easier to just show the pieces styled together to give shoppers the right idea but let them decide how they want to wear it? Someone please explain. Thanks.