Trend Test: Totally Tubular

In the history of mascaras, first came the primer craze, then there were fibers, followed by vibrating wands, and now tubes take their turn as the lat
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In the history of mascaras, first came the primer craze, then there were fibers, followed by vibrating wands, and now tubes take their turn as the lat
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In the history of mascaras, first came the primer craze, then there were fibers, followed by vibrating wands, and now tubes take their turn as the latest lash craze. The original tube mascara, Blinc, was a cult hit, lauded by beauty editors near and far. Naturally, L'Oréal and Stila have followed suit. For the uninitiated, tube mascaras contain lengthening tubes that are created using heat-sensitive polymers that wrap around the lashes, forming a literal tube that adheres to individual lashes for both a water and smudge-proof finish. They also claim to wash off with just warm water and a little bit of pressure. L'Oréal's Double Extend Beauty Tubes mascara launched earlier this year, which comes with primer on one end to (supposedly) give you salon-extension worthy lashes. Meanwhile, Stila launched their Convertible Mascara last month, another double-ended deal, only this one has a regular-sized lengthening brush on one end and a smaller defining brush on the other. I tried out both mascaras and while I definitely got some added length, I wasn't exactly creating a breeze with ginormo feather lashes. The one claim that did hold true was the ease of removal. It was actually a little creepy to see the little tubes fall off and into the sink; I looked like I was molting. I was a little skeptical of the tubes at first but after years of dealing with smudgy mascara after smudgy mascara, these were a welcome relief. I might even give up my Becca Ultimate Mascara in favor of one of these. So what do you think, are you a tube convert or is this just a passing fad? --MEGAN MCINTYRE