Splurging: Good or Bad?

If you spend a lot of money on things you want now, you're probably a lot happier than people who resist the urge and save their money for an unnamed
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If you spend a lot of money on things you want now, you're probably a lot happier than people who resist the urge and save their money for an unnamed
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If you spend a lot of money on things you want now, you're probably a lot happier than people who resist the urge and save their money for an unnamed future purchase - at least according to a study released by professors at Columbia and Harvard. They say a few days of guilt is nothing compared to the people who've bypassed Fendi for years only to feel like they've missed out on life. In this story in the London Times (which we think might have been sponsored by luxury brands begging shoppers back), the author talks about splurging on expensive non-necessities like it's therapy, but speaking from experience it's more like a sugar high. We can justify just about anything, but in ten years will the abundance of shoes in our closet make us feel like we've lived life to the fullest or make us wish they'd turn into an apartment? Maybe not worth worrying about right now, but we'd like to hear the professors on the other side of this argument. Which makes you feel better, splurging on that Chanel bag you saw Kate Moss carrying or seeing more than $7 in your savings account?