Make Clothes, Not War

There has been a lot of debate among historians on whether or not the US bombing of Hiroshima was, in the long run, a necessity to end World War II, b
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There has been a lot of debate among historians on whether or not the US bombing of Hiroshima was, in the long run, a necessity to end World War II, b

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There has been a lot of debate among historians on whether or not the US bombing of Hiroshima was, in the long run, a necessity to end World War II, but there is no debate about how devastating the event and its aftereffects were. Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake grew up in Hiroshima and was there during the bombings. He later lost his mother to radiation exposure, and understandably does not like dwelling on the event. But after President Obama's recent hopes to rid our modern world of nuclear weapons, Miyake wrote a moving piece for The New York Times in which he hopes that this is the beginning of the end of nuclear warfare.

His whole article choked us up a little, but we were particularly touched by how his past influences his thoughts on fashion. He writes, "I have tried, albeit unsuccessfully, to put [the memories] behind me, preferring to think of things that can be created, not destroyed, and that bring beauty and joy. I gravitated toward the field of clothing design, partly because it is a creative format that is modern and optimistic." We have always seen fashion as art, and one that impacts everyone day-to-day. But for those that think fashion is frivolous, this is just another example of how important it can be and the way it brings life and happiness to those that love it. --AMANDA JEAN BOYLE