Smelling Famous

This weekend on NPR's "All Things Considered" (which along with "This American Life" and "Car Talk" are pretty much our favorite shows), NY Times sce
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This weekend on NPR's "All Things Considered" (which along with "This American Life" and "Car Talk" are pretty much our favorite shows), NY Times sce
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This weekend on NPR's "All Things Considered" (which along with "This American Life" and "Car Talk" are pretty much our favorite shows), NY Times scent critic, Chandler Burr was on the show discussing celebrity fragrances. Burr said, "It [fragrance] is the single best tool for monetizing celebrity that's ever been created in the history of the world. It is a kind of financial alchemy the likes of which we've never seen." This got me thinking because I was always under the impression that the best way to monetize celebrity was to put the celebrity to work in his/her chosen field, ie put Reese Witherspoon in a romantic comedy or have Mariah Carey release an album. And it's not like I didn't know celebrity fragrance was a profitable thing. If it wasn't, we wouldn't have so many of them for me to bitch about. But when you throw in phrases like "in the history of the world," I take notice. At the end of the day, it's really a no harm/no foul situation. I don't have to buy a perfume I don't like, and those who do like it, can. I guess I just wish that we could make better smelling stuff at the mass level (that doesn't smell so typical), even if the only way to sell it is to slap a famous person's name on it.