Sour Advertising

I missed this on Friday because I was on a plane for twenty-two hours, but WWD ran a blurb about bloggers stealing fashion ads. A few houses including
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I missed this on Friday because I was on a plane for twenty-two hours, but WWD ran a blurb about bloggers stealing fashion ads. A few houses including

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I missed this on Friday because I was on a plane for twenty-two hours, but WWD ran a blurb about bloggers stealing fashion ads. A few houses including Celine and Balenciaga are up in arms over websites and blogs posting their SS10 ads before they debut in the major fashion magazines (while most labels flood our inboxes with press releases, images and behind the scenes footage of said campaigns). In fact, they're so distraught that Katie Grand was forced to publicly apologize for posting the ads on LOVE's blog, "This was a genuine human error, made in enthusiasm, and it was certainly never our intention to upset anyone, in particular designers we hold in such high esteem."

We post ads because they're fun, because they're pretty, because they're exciting, and most importantly, because they serve as a bridge from the runway to the store. Most customers experience new fashion for the first time via print ads and aside from the most hardcore fashion lovers among us, no one buys a magazine solely for its ads. If brands think so, if WWD thinks so, they're delusional. But most importantly, throwing a fit over free advertising while paying thousands of dollars for an overlapping audience to see the same image in next month's Elle is outrageous. At the end of their story, WWD reveals the headless Celine models: Carmen Kass, Lisanne de Jong, Jacquelyn Jablonski and Valerija Kelava. We can't imagine the tantrum Celine's throwing now.