Is Fashion's Inclusivity Kick Working?

Fashion, perhaps more than any other industry, has been branded with the word "exclusive," but this month the industry appears to be doing everything
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Fashion, perhaps more than any other industry, has been branded with the word "exclusive," but this month the industry appears to be doing everything

Fashion, perhaps more than any other industry, has been branded with the word "exclusive," but this month the industry appears to be doing everything in its power to be anything but.

Almost every major label--or at least the most anticipated--is livestreaming their show via Nick Knight's Showstudio or their own personal websites. Alexander Wang's show played in the middle of Times Square, Dolce & Gabbana is going straight to your iPhone, and Henry Holland's let you shop from his catwalk this afternoon. Meanwhile, major industry players like Joe Zee and Julie Gilhart tweet from the front row, Style.com's reviews are up within hours, and an increasing number of blogs are covering fashion week first hand.

But is it working?

Do the fashion observers who don't work in fashion feel more included? And, if this trend continues, will physical attendance become more exclusive?

One editor puts it bluntly, "If thousands of people get to feel included from the outside, than actual, inside attendance will become more and more exclusive. Otherwise, how will the important people know they're important?"