Zac Posen's Company is Just About Screwed, But Still Hopeful

We live for this kind of fashion journalism. In a lengthy profile that actually told us a few things we didn't already know, NYT's Eric Wilson documen
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
0
We live for this kind of fashion journalism. In a lengthy profile that actually told us a few things we didn't already know, NYT's Eric Wilson documen

Image Title1

We live for this kind of fashion journalism. In a lengthy profile that actually told us a few things we didn't already know, NYT's Eric Wilson documents the rise and potential demise of Zac Posen, whose company was hit particularly hard by the recession. Here's what we learned, and what we can add: President and CEO Laura O'Conner was let go at the end of last year. O'Conner's known for being smart about the buying leg of the fashion business but difficult to work with. So it's no surprise that Zac's mom, Susan, is back in the executive chair. The designer feels like "he's grown up in the last year," and is working on making sure people are paying attention to the clothes, rather than his high-flying lifestyle. He's been reading John Fairchild's Chic Savages, about the rise of society designers. (We, in turn, just ordered the book on Amazon for $4.)

Attempts at a perfume and a secondary line faltered. The fragrance, with a bottle designed by Fabien Baron, was stalled after two years of development. However, the diffusion line for Saks Fifth Avenue--Z Spoke--will indeed hit stores March 1. And the Target collection has received great feedback from the press. So there is some good news. However, it should be noted that designers rarely make more than five figures on those Target collections. And while the Saks diffusion line will offer some steady income, Posen still needs to start selling collection dresses, rather than simply outfitting celebrities for free.