Happy Birthday Doc Martens, Part I

When I was in 7th grade, all I wanted was to dress like Drew Barrymore. I had a purple floral skirt, which I'd wear with a little black t-shirt, an
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When I was in 7th grade, all I wanted was to dress like Drew Barrymore. I had a purple floral skirt, which I'd wear with a little black t-shirt, an
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When I was in 7th grade, all I wanted was to dress like Drew Barrymore.

I had a purple floral skirt, which I'd wear with a little black t-shirt, and 14-hole black Doc Martens--it was the perfect look. Until one of the 8th grade boys said, "You're not a skater, why do you think you can wear Docs?"

"Um, because I love them," I answered (I think).

And now they're back with a vengeance. OK, they haven't really gone anywhere, but April 1st marks the company's 50th anniversary and they've pulled out every stop in celebration of their big birthday starting with breakfast at The Standard this morning, and the premiere of their collaborative music videos. They've worked with the Noisettes, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, the Raveonettes, and the Duke Spirit, who've produced a beautiful black and white version of The Duke Spirit's remake of "The Kids Are United" and the debut of their Opening Ceremony exclusives.

The music videos, three of which will go public next week, are framed by commentary from Kate Lanphear, Kate Moross, Valerie Phillips, Johnny Blue Eyes, Trash & Vaudeville's Jimmy Webb (who's actually brought to tears by his love for this shoe), and various other musicians, artists and lovers of Doc Martens explaining the origins of both the shoe and its punk symbolism.

Watch a preview of what's to come here.