Cacharel Shows at Tunis Fashion Week

During Tunis Fashion Week (a baby celebrating its second birthday), Cacharel was invited as guest of honor. The French house, famous for its its flowe
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
33
During Tunis Fashion Week (a baby celebrating its second birthday), Cacharel was invited as guest of honor. The French house, famous for its its flowe
Image Title1

During Tunis Fashion Week (a baby celebrating its second birthday), Cacharel was invited as guest of honor. The French house, famous for its its flowery je ne sais quoi, showed pieces initially presented during Paris Fashion Week.

Laura Guillermin, Cacharel's spokesperson, talked to Fashionista about the house’s decision to show in Tunis, exploring a new market, and the exoticism of the French girl abroad.

There are alternative fashion weeks all over the world. Why did you specifically decide to show in Tunis? Cacharel has a history of accompanying young designers and projects. We were seduced by the idea of participating to a very young fashion week, and by its partnership with local fashion schools. And of course, being guest of honor is a mark of respect.

But it was also a way of checking out the local market, to see the potential of Cacharel in the region.

The clothes you showed have already been seen on the Parisian catwalk of SS 2010. Did you just show the exact same thing? And why? It wasn’t a duplicate, but rather, a selection of pieces made with Cédric Charlier, which are representative of the first show. The Tunis show followed the same cycle: it started of with white, followed by nude and then by printed colors, to come back to blue and end with a final flower bouquet.

We are not trying to reinvent ourselves for this new market, but we of course have to adapt: the fashion culture there is very different, and has its own, specific needs. For example, we focused on showing longer cuts, dresses with long sleeves.

The fashion in Tunis is very different than in France, and Cacharel definitely stood out during the fashion week. Do you think the clothes has a future with Tunisian girls? In Mediterranean countries, it’s true that the notion of elegance is very different. Girls like to show off their assets; in France or Belgium, femininity is expressed in other subtle ways. I do think Cacharel can work there, because there is the idea of Parisian exoticism. People say that Parisian women have more elegance than style, and this is what Cedric creates: structural, subtle, architectural pieces that elegantly accompany the movement. And what have the reactions been so far? We were scared of falling flat, but we received a great amount of compliments. People appreciate the cut, the structures, and the simplicity. Are the girls there ready to give it a try? Only time will tell.