Do You Even Care if Your Clothing is Eco-Friendly?

April 22 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and the "green" press releases are beginning to infiltrate our inboxes. While we're not opposed to
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
83
April 22 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and the "green" press releases are beginning to infiltrate our inboxes. While we're not opposed to
Image Title1

April 22 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, and the "green" press releases are beginning to infiltrate our inboxes.

While we're not opposed to conserving for the earth's sake, we are opposed to greenwashing.

That's the term for marketing something as "eco-friendly" when it's not really that eco-friendly. H&M's been criticized for this in the past, as have plenty of other brands.

But really, it's not H&M's, or any other mass retailer's fault. Because no matter what they do, no matter how hard they try, their clothing will never be eco-friendly. How can something shipped across the world via a huge airplane be eco-friendly?

The only true way to reduce your carbon footprint, at least when it comes to clothes, is to a) buy items made locally with cotton or wool that was produced locally or b) not. buy. anything. at. all.

That's the part people don't want to hear. To be truly eco-friendly, we've got to reduce consumption.

And another thing: Isn't it more important to like the clothes you buy and wear them over and over again, rather than buy certain clothes because you feel like you have to? Those types of purchases end up in the Goodwill pile.

Labels that are both designed well and produced fairly are few and far between, but we wish that there were more of them. For instance, we're confident that we'd love John Patrick's clothes regardless of whether or not they were eco-friendly. That's just an added plus.

Here's our question: Are you eco-conscious? If so, how does it affect your fashion choices?