Do You Want Your Gadgets to Be Girly?

So, my new iPhone is scheduled to arrive in the mail today. And I'm really excited. I've owned my original iPhone for two years now, and I'm ready for a change. The iPhone was the first phone I ever spent more than $30 on--mostly because in the past, I've found most hand held devices available in the US to be downright ugly. Which brings me to my next point: Today I received a pitch about Sony's new designs for its VAIO EA-Series Signature Collection. The laptops, with an etched pattern called "Arabesque," are available in pink, black, and gold. Let me be clear. These aren't horrible looking. But they aren't amazing, either. The issue? The suits running Sony--and companies like Sony--don't get what women want.
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So, my new iPhone is scheduled to arrive in the mail today. And I'm really excited. I've owned my original iPhone for two years now, and I'm ready for a change. The iPhone was the first phone I ever spent more than $30 on--mostly because in the past, I've found most hand held devices available in the US to be downright ugly. Which brings me to my next point: Today I received a pitch about Sony's new designs for its VAIO EA-Series Signature Collection. The laptops, with an etched pattern called "Arabesque," are available in pink, black, and gold. Let me be clear. These aren't horrible looking. But they aren't amazing, either. The issue? The suits running Sony--and companies like Sony--don't get what women want.
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So, my new iPhone is scheduled to arrive in the mail today. And I'm really excited. I've owned my original iPhone for two years now, and I'm ready for a change. The iPhone was the first phone I ever spent more than $30 on--mostly because in the past, I've found most hand held devices available in the US to be downright ugly.

Which brings me to my next point: Today I received a pitch about Sony's new designs for its VAIO EA-Series Signature Collection. The laptops, with an etched pattern called "Arabesque," are available in pink, black, and gold.

Let me be clear. These aren't horrible looking. But they aren't amazing, either.

The issue? The suits running Sony--and companies like Sony--don't get what women want.

Think about the laptops Vivienne Tam and other designers have created for HP. (We actually gave one away to a reader a few months ago.) Again, I don't think these are downright ugly, but I also don't think I'd personally carry one, even if I was a PC person.

To be fair, tech companies are savvy in certain ways: They're attempting to attract more females, a segment of the market with plenty of room to grow. But I feel like they're going about it in the wrong way. Women, much like men, want their products to look good. That's why I buy Apple--because it looks good. (And it also works, but that's not a story for this site.)

Another company that gets it right? Incase. While they only provide protection for gadgets, it's good-looking protection. Incase's collaboration with Another Magazine, Gareth Pugh and Colette is much more attractive to me than a pale pink cell phone.

What should these firms do to better connect with female consumers? Hire people who actually know what they're talking about when it comes to what looks good and what doesn't. Don't rely on market research, which is something big companies tend to fall back on.

What do you think? Do you like girl-i-fied gadgets? Or are you simply after great design?