A Concrete Explanation For Why Our Favorite Runway Looks Don't Get Made

Okay, so you may not be happy with my choice of shoes (I'm looking at you, Ian!) but I think most of you have experienced what I wrote about earlier. That is, finding something you love on the runway or in a magazine, only to later discover it was never put into production. Anyways, I mentioned that department store and boutique buyers have something to do with this. If no one puts in orders for these items, they won't be made. But my very knowledgeable friend Jessica Gold, who runs a fashion business consultancy called JG and Co., has a much more in-depth, educated explanation that I thought I'd share with you:
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Okay, so you may not be happy with my choice of shoes (I'm looking at you, Ian!) but I think most of you have experienced what I wrote about earlier. That is, finding something you love on the runway or in a magazine, only to later discover it was never put into production. Anyways, I mentioned that department store and boutique buyers have something to do with this. If no one puts in orders for these items, they won't be made. But my very knowledgeable friend Jessica Gold, who runs a fashion business consultancy called JG and Co., has a much more in-depth, educated explanation that I thought I'd share with you:
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Okay, so you may not be happy with my choice of shoes (I'm looking at you, Ian!) but I think most of you have experienced what I wrote about earlier. That is, finding something you love on the runway or in a magazine, only to later discover it was never put into production.

Anyways, I mentioned that department store and boutique buyers have something to do with this. If no one puts in orders for these items, they won't be made. But my very knowledgeable friend Jessica Gold, who runs a fashion business consultancy called JG and Co., has a much more in-depth, educated explanation that I thought I'd share with you:

"You're right-this stuff happens all the time. But it's not exactly anyone's fault, It's the process' fault.

As you point out, the first problem is the fashion cycle. All of these companies are on this wild ride to present editors, boutiques, dept stores, international accounts the best, hottest most fashion-forward pieces. In reality, what sells in showrooms and at trade shows is either a more basic color of an item, a cheaper version of an item, wardrobe basics, etc.

However, the actual problem is more complex. Even if there is interest in an editorial piece by a boutique or department store's buyers, if the demand doesn't reach the minimum they need to produce, it just never gets made. The buyers are pure number crunchers and are dealing only with wholesale or retail projections. The editorial stuff they mostly see as fluff that doesn't impact numbers.

Another part of the puzzle is PR, which needs to present editors with stand-out, amazing stuff that can be picked up for magazines or blogs. Often the sample was very expensive to produce and the companies just don't have the dollars to make mass amounts of them if there is no assurance it will sell. Again, the timing is also not lined up properly--magazines work many months out and pieces are sometimes dropped last-minute. [Which explains why I can't get my Sigerson Morrison's.]

The last part of the puzzle is everyone--in the business and regular shoppers alike--is seeing runway pieces and samples online the second they are shown to editors. This is both good and bad. Excitement is built. But buys are based on wholesale and so the average consumer really does lose their say. And of course it's upsetting when the pieces companies couldn't afford to make never show up in stores."

So there's the full story. A big thanks to Jessica, who really knows her stuff!