Istanbul Fashion Week: The Best of the Rest

Istanbul Fashion Week has come to an end. For a new fashion week (this is only their third season), Istanbul put on quite a show, capping off the week with supermodel Alessandro Ambrosio, who flew in the night before to walk in the Koton swimwear show. Istanbul is home to around 15 million people. It's a vibrant, chaotic and beautiful place, and I quickly learned that getting around is not as simple as hopping on the tram, or jumping in a cab and giving your driver a street address. Directions are much more vague in Istanbul--ancient mosques, old stone doors, and even "down around the hill" are markers. So it was merely a reflection of the city, that the scene at the Taskisla Building at Istanbtul Techinical University, the venue for Istanbul Fashion Week, was a bit chaotic and difficult to navigate as well. But in spite of the chaos, or because of it, Istanbul Fashion Week was a blast. The shows were inventive, and the designers put out inspired collections. A big thank you to ELLE Turkey and itkib Istanbul for hosting me. I could write for days about everything I saw--both at Istanbul Fashion Week and the sites I explored in the city itself. But I won't. Here's the best of the rest:
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Leah Chernikoff
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Istanbul Fashion Week has come to an end. For a new fashion week (this is only their third season), Istanbul put on quite a show, capping off the week with supermodel Alessandro Ambrosio, who flew in the night before to walk in the Koton swimwear show. Istanbul is home to around 15 million people. It's a vibrant, chaotic and beautiful place, and I quickly learned that getting around is not as simple as hopping on the tram, or jumping in a cab and giving your driver a street address. Directions are much more vague in Istanbul--ancient mosques, old stone doors, and even "down around the hill" are markers. So it was merely a reflection of the city, that the scene at the Taskisla Building at Istanbtul Techinical University, the venue for Istanbul Fashion Week, was a bit chaotic and difficult to navigate as well. But in spite of the chaos, or because of it, Istanbul Fashion Week was a blast. The shows were inventive, and the designers put out inspired collections. A big thank you to ELLE Turkey and itkib Istanbul for hosting me. I could write for days about everything I saw--both at Istanbul Fashion Week and the sites I explored in the city itself. But I won't. Here's the best of the rest:
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Istanbul Fashion Week has come to an end. For a new fashion week (this is only their third season), Istanbul put on quite a show, capping off the week with supermodel Alessandro Ambrosio, who flew in the night before to walk in the Koton swimwear show.

Istanbul is home to around 15 million people. It's a vibrant, chaotic and beautiful place, and I quickly learned that getting around is not as simple as hopping on the tram, or jumping in a cab and giving your driver a street address. Directions are much more vague in Istanbul--ancient mosques, old stone doors, and even "down around the hill" are markers. So it was merely a reflection of the city, that the scene at the Taskisla Building at Istanbtul Techinical University, the venue for Istanbul Fashion Week, was a bit chaotic and difficult to navigate as well. But in spite of the chaos, or because of it, Istanbul Fashion Week was a blast. The shows were inventive, and the designers put out inspired collections.

A big thank you to ELLE Turkey and itkib Istanbul for hosting me.

I could write for days about everything I saw--both at Istanbul Fashion Week and the sites I explored in the city itself. But I won't. Here's the best of the rest:

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Zeynep Tosun's show. A favorite of the foreign press, including Susie Lau (these are her images).

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Massage at the renowned Cagaloglu Hamami (Turkish Bath), where Kate Moss was photographed for that gorgeous W spread two years ago. So awesome.

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The Hussein Chalayan exhibit at the Istanbul Modern. One of the best fashion exhibits I've seen hands down. The show expertly laid out Chalayan's work from 1994 on, including one of the dresses he buried and exhumed for his graduate collection at Central Saint Martins.