Why Does the Good Stuff Never Actually Get Produced?

It's easy to critique American Vogue, but there are things I really admire about the magazine. For instance, Meredith Melling Burke's Index pages. They accomplish what so many market pages don't--they tell a compelling story while also legitimately attempting to sell the reader on the items featured. In a recent issue--I think it was July--she offered up a pair of gorgeous red suede Sigerson Morrison kitten heels. They were immediately added to my list of fall Needs. Problem is, they didn't get produced.
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It's easy to critique American Vogue, but there are things I really admire about the magazine. For instance, Meredith Melling Burke's Index pages. They accomplish what so many market pages don't--they tell a compelling story while also legitimately attempting to sell the reader on the items featured. In a recent issue--I think it was July--she offered up a pair of gorgeous red suede Sigerson Morrison kitten heels. They were immediately added to my list of fall Needs. Problem is, they didn't get produced.
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It's easy to critique American Vogue, but there are things I really admire about the magazine. For instance, Meredith Melling Burke's Index pages. They accomplish what so many market pages don't--they tell a compelling story while also legitimately attempting to sell the reader on the items featured. In a recent issue--I think it was July--she offered up a pair of gorgeous red suede Sigerson Morrison kitten heels. They were immediately added to my list of fall Needs.

Problem is, they didn't get produced.

The Fashionista office is right near Sigerson Morrison's boutique in Nolita, but before I even stepped a foot in the door, I emailed my PR contact to see if the shoes were in the store yet. He said that they weren't in the New York store, which had only purchased the black version, but the LA store had bought them in red. I figured I'd place a phone order with the LA boutique after I saw the black version in person. So yesterday after work, I popped over to Sigerson, only to be told that the black kitten heels were still in production and wouldn't be on the floor for another week or so.

Oh, and the salesperson also informed me that NO red shoes were produced, and that my PR friend had lied to me. There weren't enough orders, so it wasn't worth producing them. "Was it the English guy?" said the salesperson. "I need to tell him to stop giving out false information!"

Whether or not the salesperson or the PR guy were right I'm still not sure. But I am a little disgruntled. Over the last couple of years, I've begun to do what I already was telling everyone else to do: Buy a few things that I really love instead of a ton of things that I only like. The problem? The things I really love are either never produced or, if they are, they don't look the way they did on the runway.

I get that buyers believe most women would prefer the sleeveless version of the bracelet sleeve Erdem dress I so desperately wanted for my wedding. But in an era when women can peruse runway looks hours after they've debuted, is it right for buyers to make decisions like that for us?

Have you ever badly wanted something, only to find out it was never made?