Intentional Indecision at Bensoni

During Fashion Week, there’s only one accessory carried by editors, stylists, and bloggers at every show: the informational pamphlet. It numbers the progression of looks, making it easy to follow along and circle favorites, and details the designer’s inspiration behind the show. (After all, some collections warrant written word. Headbands + ripped denim = “Blair Waldorf does Coachella”? Oh, okay.) But sometimes the vision is niche, and sometimes it’s not. At yesterday’s Bensoni presentation, the pamphlet attempted to pinpoint the inspiration behind designers Sonia Yoon and Benjamin Channing Clyburn’s collection, but perhaps raised more questions than it answered. A paradox of “grounded and restless, traditional and iconoclastic, serene and daring, elegant and slight disheveled, sensible and spontaneous” it read. Really, what else is there?
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
2
During Fashion Week, there’s only one accessory carried by editors, stylists, and bloggers at every show: the informational pamphlet. It numbers the progression of looks, making it easy to follow along and circle favorites, and details the designer’s inspiration behind the show. (After all, some collections warrant written word. Headbands + ripped denim = “Blair Waldorf does Coachella”? Oh, okay.) But sometimes the vision is niche, and sometimes it’s not. At yesterday’s Bensoni presentation, the pamphlet attempted to pinpoint the inspiration behind designers Sonia Yoon and Benjamin Channing Clyburn’s collection, but perhaps raised more questions than it answered. A paradox of “grounded and restless, traditional and iconoclastic, serene and daring, elegant and slight disheveled, sensible and spontaneous” it read. Really, what else is there?
Image Title1

During Fashion Week, there’s only one accessory carried by editors, stylists, and bloggers at every show: the informational pamphlet. It numbers the progression of looks, making it easy to follow along and circle favorites, and details the designer’s inspiration behind the show. (After all, some collections warrant written word. Headbands + ripped denim = “Blair Waldorf does Coachella”? Oh, okay.)

But sometimes the vision is niche, and sometimes it’s not. At yesterday’s Bensoni presentation, the pamphlet attempted to pinpoint the inspiration behind designers Sonia Yoon and Benjamin Channing Clyburn’s collection, but perhaps raised more questions than it answered. A paradox of “grounded and restless, traditional and iconoclastic, serene and daring, elegant and slight disheveled, sensible and spontaneous” it read. Really, what else is there?

Trying to merge all those adjectives into one aesthetic meant, of course,that the presentation jumped all over the place—but in a good way.

In only twenty looks, the collection bounced from neons to neutrals and pleated volume to sleek silhouettes, while tossing as many glances at the seventies as it did towards the future.

Even the individual looks declared dichotomies: floating, tiered chiffon rendered in acidic neons, and my personal favorite, a simple blue print shift with a white pleated column attached to the front as if it didn’t belong—again, in a good way.

The collection was for the girl who likes to not make up her mind, who doesn’t want to corner her night’s outfit (much less her closet) into one recognizable style. While young designers are often pushed to establish a clear voice as if a necessary rite of passage, Bensoni’s team showed that some collections are multifaceted—just like the girls that wear them--and need not have just one voice and one mood.

Phew.