Nicolas Andreas Taralis Spring 2011: Life after Hedi and Cerruti

PARIS--After leaving his own label for two years and making an express appearance at Cerutti, Nicolas Andreas Taralis is in the spotlight again. And the former assistant to Hedi Slimane is in good hands: the grande dame Michèle Montagne (the matron of Ann Demeulemeester and Haider Ackermann) is now looking after him. His comeback collection contrasted severity and airiness, leather and paper-thin silk. His Tuesday show at Palais de Tokyo felt like an organic evolution of last season’s designs: a similar play on contrasts, skinny belting on sturdier cuts, peaks of skin, sheer draping, all carried out on knotted wedges and boots, by male and female models. “There wasn’t one obvious, direct inspiration, but more like a reflection of what I’ve liked for some time already,” Taralis told us backstage after the show.
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PARIS--After leaving his own label for two years and making an express appearance at Cerutti, Nicolas Andreas Taralis is in the spotlight again. And the former assistant to Hedi Slimane is in good hands: the grande dame Michèle Montagne (the matron of Ann Demeulemeester and Haider Ackermann) is now looking after him. His comeback collection contrasted severity and airiness, leather and paper-thin silk. His Tuesday show at Palais de Tokyo felt like an organic evolution of last season’s designs: a similar play on contrasts, skinny belting on sturdier cuts, peaks of skin, sheer draping, all carried out on knotted wedges and boots, by male and female models. “There wasn’t one obvious, direct inspiration, but more like a reflection of what I’ve liked for some time already,” Taralis told us backstage after the show.
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PARIS--After leaving his own label for two years and making an express appearance at Cerutti, Nicolas Andreas Taralis is in the spotlight again. And the former assistant to Hedi Slimane is in good hands: the grande dame Michèle Montagne (the matron of Ann Demeulemeester and Haider Ackermann) is now looking after him.

His comeback collection contrasted severity and airiness, leather and paper-thin silk.

His Tuesday show at Palais de Tokyo felt like an organic evolution of last season’s designs: a similar play on contrasts, skinny belting on sturdier cuts, peaks of skin, sheer draping, all carried out on knotted wedges and boots, by male and female models.

“There wasn’t one obvious, direct inspiration, but more like a reflection of what I’ve liked for some time already,” Taralis told us backstage after the show. Indeed, elements such as a large V shape cut out from the back of a sheer shirt and light shawls tossed over the head added a summery feel to his somewhat Gothic clothes.

Other artful oppositions included military-meets-street silhouettes, with cargo-esque pants in thick mesh, paired with button-up shirts, throwing in a touch of monastery chic.

“I look at folk like a modern tribe, but there is also an element of street style. But my starting point is always something very traditional,” said the designer.

How does it feel to be back? “I’m very, very happy. Fashion might change, my view of it hasn’t,” he continued.

As for gender bending, we had to note a man in a tutu, and on the female side, much breast on show.

Who is the Taralis woman of the summer? “Well, I don’t know her, but I certainly hope to meet her soon,” Taralis said with a smile.

**All photos by Eulalie Juster.