Protect the Check: An Update On Burberry V. Body Glove Plus The Legal Docs You Haven't Seen

As we reported yesterday, Burberry is suing Body Glove, manufacturers of phone covers that will make your iPhone look like the inside of a one of their trench coats. According to legal docs obtained by Fashionista, Burberry is accusing the defendants of "willful infringement of Burberry's famous, federally-registered BURBERRY CHECK trademarks." Burberry claims that by making and selling the copycat cellphone cases, the defendants are capitalizing on the "goodwill and fame" associated with the check; misleading consumers and diluting the value of the check. Burberry takes their check very, very seriously.
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Dhani Mau
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As we reported yesterday, Burberry is suing Body Glove, manufacturers of phone covers that will make your iPhone look like the inside of a one of their trench coats. According to legal docs obtained by Fashionista, Burberry is accusing the defendants of "willful infringement of Burberry's famous, federally-registered BURBERRY CHECK trademarks." Burberry claims that by making and selling the copycat cellphone cases, the defendants are capitalizing on the "goodwill and fame" associated with the check; misleading consumers and diluting the value of the check. Burberry takes their check very, very seriously.
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As we reported yesterday, Burberry is suing Body Glove, manufacturers of phone covers that will make your iPhone look like the inside of a one of their trench coats.

According to legal docs obtained by Fashionista, Burberry is accusing the defendants of "willful infringement of Burberry's famous, federally-registered BURBERRY CHECK trademarks." Burberry claims that by making and selling the copycat cellphone cases, the defendants are capitalizing on the "goodwill and fame" associated with the check; misleading consumers and diluting the value of the check.

Burberry takes their check very, very seriously. In addition to an extremely specific description of the check (seen below), there are eight separate "principal registers" from the United States Patent and Trademark Office, registered between 1983 to 2004, included in the documents. The check is the same but the coloration assigned to particular garments warrants separate trademarks. One register is for socks, for example. These documents make up "Exhibit B." Exhibit A features images of Burberry-produced items that bear the check, while Exhibit C shows images of Body Glove's infringing phone cases.