If You Still Haven't Bought Gifts for the Men in Your Life, Jack Spade is a Good Place to Start

This happens to me never: I love everything at Jack Spade. The brand, whose very elegant, and very male satchels, bags, wallets and trinkets can be found in immaculately edited shops—from SoHo to Venice Beach, as well as Barneys and a host of other department stores—is branching out with its third season of apparel. And I want it all. From the herringbone, three-button, Stutsman jacket to thee playful striped sweaters, to the bulky knits, it’s a winter wonderland of style. Actor Tobias Segal, who I recently caught in the play Edgewise, and who will be appearing in Men in Black III, came with me to see what I’d been raving about. And do a little shopping. Jack Spade’s vice president and general manager, Cuan Hanley, has taken a brand whose limited offerings were already firmly rooted in heritage themes and expanded into a full collection that doesn’t come near to the trendy traps of the genre that have captured more established apparel brands like Rag & Bone. For everything from scarves to leather goods, this should be your one-stop for your guy, your dad, your brother, or yourself this Christmas.
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This happens to me never: I love everything at Jack Spade. The brand, whose very elegant, and very male satchels, bags, wallets and trinkets can be found in immaculately edited shops—from SoHo to Venice Beach, as well as Barneys and a host of other department stores—is branching out with its third season of apparel. And I want it all. From the herringbone, three-button, Stutsman jacket to thee playful striped sweaters, to the bulky knits, it’s a winter wonderland of style. Actor Tobias Segal, who I recently caught in the play Edgewise, and who will be appearing in Men in Black III, came with me to see what I’d been raving about. And do a little shopping. Jack Spade’s vice president and general manager, Cuan Hanley, has taken a brand whose limited offerings were already firmly rooted in heritage themes and expanded into a full collection that doesn’t come near to the trendy traps of the genre that have captured more established apparel brands like Rag & Bone. For everything from scarves to leather goods, this should be your one-stop for your guy, your dad, your brother, or yourself this Christmas.
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This happens to me never: I love everything at Jack Spade. The brand, whose very elegant, and very male satchels, bags, wallets and trinkets can be found in immaculately edited shops—from SoHo to Venice Beach, as well as Barneys and a host of other department stores—is branching out with its third season of apparel. And I want it all.

From the herringbone, three-button, Stutsman jacket to thee playful striped sweaters, to the bulky knits, it’s a winter wonderland of style. Actor Tobias Segal, who I recently caught in the play Edgewise, and who will be appearing in Men in Black III, came with me to see what I’d been raving about. And do a little shopping.

Jack Spade’s vice president and general manager, Cuan Hanley, has taken a brand whose limited offerings were already firmly rooted in heritage themes and expanded into a full collection that doesn’t come near to the trendy traps of the genre that have captured more established apparel brands like Rag & Bone.

For everything from scarves to leather goods, this should be your one-stop for your guy, your dad, your brother, or yourself this Christmas.

As for the New Year and beyond, what I’m really looking forward to are the collaborations Hanley has in store: the efforts with Mackintosh on coats, and the shoes and boots with Rancourt aren’t going to blow anybody’s hair back, but they’re a good start.

One caveat: the price point. Shirts upwards of $195, and jackets around the $495 mark are what you’d expect of a niche American heritage brand hawking its refined wares from a cool shop in SoHo. But the apparel is made in China, and Jack Spade has a bustling online business, so those numbers border on what my mother would call “nervy.” Hanley’s explanation--that most of their fabrics are produced in Europe, Japan and the US, and that Jack Spade’s (few) USA-made products are no more expensive—don’t really fly with me.

That said, I’m still sold. Jack Spade is the first place I went Christmas shopping this year. If they can offer the same classic brilliance (and bring down the prices) next year it will be the only place.

All items available at www.jackspade.com.