New American Apparel Ads: Finally, Dov Charney Can Show Pubes

Just when you thought Dov Charney was toning things down while his empire teetered on the edge of bankruptcy (his last ads showed him at hard at work on his laptop, fully clothed, with his two creative directors--albeit in bed), new print ads that appeared in the Village Voice and Vice show American Apparel models fully nude, bush included. Of course, American Apparel's latest ads don't feature college freshmen as models. They're illustrated. These ads mark a dramatic shift in the brand's advertising, which has relied, since its inception, on '70s-style Polaroid porn shots of lamé-clad real women in suggestive poses. The ads are still unmistakably American Apparel--'70s vibe, naked girls, suggestively posed, etc.,--but to go from using real models, a hallmark of the American Apparel brand, to illustrated ads might be a sign that the brand is investing in serious cost cutting measures, as Copyranter points out.
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Leah Chernikoff
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Just when you thought Dov Charney was toning things down while his empire teetered on the edge of bankruptcy (his last ads showed him at hard at work on his laptop, fully clothed, with his two creative directors--albeit in bed), new print ads that appeared in the Village Voice and Vice show American Apparel models fully nude, bush included. Of course, American Apparel's latest ads don't feature college freshmen as models. They're illustrated. These ads mark a dramatic shift in the brand's advertising, which has relied, since its inception, on '70s-style Polaroid porn shots of lamé-clad real women in suggestive poses. The ads are still unmistakably American Apparel--'70s vibe, naked girls, suggestively posed, etc.,--but to go from using real models, a hallmark of the American Apparel brand, to illustrated ads might be a sign that the brand is investing in serious cost cutting measures, as Copyranter points out.
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Just when you thought Dov Charney was toning things down while his empire teetered on the edge of bankruptcy (his last ads showed him at hard at work on his laptop, fully clothed, with his two creative directors--albeit in bed), new print ads that appeared in the Village Voice and Vice show American Apparel models fully nude, bush included.

Of course, American Apparel's latest ads don't feature college freshmen as models. They're illustrated. These ads mark a dramatic shift in the brand's advertising, which has relied, since its inception, on '70s-style Polaroid porn shots of lamé-clad real women in suggestive poses. The ads are still unmistakably American Apparel--'70s vibe, naked girls, suggestively posed, etc.,--but to go from using real models, a hallmark of the American Apparel brand, to illustrated ads might be a sign that the brand is investing in serious cost cutting measures, as Copyranter points out.

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Or maybe an illustrator costs more. If Vogue only pays their models $225 a shoot--and these are professional A-list models represented by a major agencies we're talking about--we shudder to think what Dov pays his harem of real women-as-models (often just employees of the company).