Vogue Opens Its' Doors to Give Readers the "Vogue Experience"

You didn't think we were talking about Anna Wintour and US Vogue, did you? No, it's Vogue Italia that is going transparent. The mag is inviting readers in for a sort of open house to get a rare behind-the-scenes look at how the magazine is put together, and the chance to meet with editor in chief Franca Sozzani as well as boldface names in Italian design like Donatella Versace and Angela Missoni. "The Vogue Experience" celebrates the launch of Sozzani's new book, I Capricci Della Moda (“The whims of fashion”), which is a collection of her blog posts on the mag's site where she details everything from her love of Uggs in a blizzard to her musings on fashion and feminism. Apparently the editrix has been criticized for the stunt and took to her blog today to write, "It upsets me that some people think that my doing this is just a commercial thing or making Vogue too democratic." "Vogue" and "democratic" are two words we never expected to hear in the same sentence. But Sozzani's got good intentions.
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Leah Chernikoff
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You didn't think we were talking about Anna Wintour and US Vogue, did you? No, it's Vogue Italia that is going transparent. The mag is inviting readers in for a sort of open house to get a rare behind-the-scenes look at how the magazine is put together, and the chance to meet with editor in chief Franca Sozzani as well as boldface names in Italian design like Donatella Versace and Angela Missoni. "The Vogue Experience" celebrates the launch of Sozzani's new book, I Capricci Della Moda (“The whims of fashion”), which is a collection of her blog posts on the mag's site where she details everything from her love of Uggs in a blizzard to her musings on fashion and feminism. Apparently the editrix has been criticized for the stunt and took to her blog today to write, "It upsets me that some people think that my doing this is just a commercial thing or making Vogue too democratic." "Vogue" and "democratic" are two words we never expected to hear in the same sentence. But Sozzani's got good intentions.
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You didn't think we were talking about Anna Wintour and US Vogue, did you?

No, it's Vogue Italia that is going transparent. The mag is inviting readers in for a sort of open house to get a rare behind-the-scenes look at how the magazine is put together, and the chance to meet with editor in chief Franca Sozzani as well as boldface names in Italian design like Donatella Versace and Angela Missoni.

"The Vogue Experience" celebrates the launch of Sozzani's new book, I Capricci Della Moda (“The whims of fashion”), which is a collection of her blog posts on the mag's site where she details everything from her love of Uggs in a blizzard to her musings on fashion and feminism. Apparently the editrix has been criticized for the stunt and took to her blog today to write, "It upsets me that some people think that my doing this is just a commercial thing or making Vogue too democratic."

"Vogue" and "democratic" are two words we never expected to hear in the same sentence. But Sozzani's got good intentions. "It's not being commercial because the book is published by Bompiani and not by Condé Nast," Sozzani says. "Opening our magazine to people is just to give them the chance to meet persons working in fashion, how we work, where we are and our offices...Why should seeing each other take away the mystery? What mystery? We make magazines just to give you quality and creativity, and obviously to keep you informed."

Sozzani will hold court at the Vogue Italia offices starting at 4 p.m. today and continue to make herself available through the weekend at designated times. So if you are anywhere near Milan sign up now at Vogue Italia's site.

"It will be like spending an afternoon at an art gallery," Sozzani says, referencing the famous fashion photos that line the halls of the office. "You will get the answers to the questions you didn't yet have a chance to ask. Great designers will satisfy the curiosity of young aspiring ones. Why shouldn't you participate in this?"