Paris Men's Fashion Flash: Lacroix Relaunches, Willhelm Goes To the Jungle, Demeulemesteer Does Edward Scissorhands

PARIS--Lacroix is back, ladies and gentlemen--sans Christian, alas. When the house closed in 2009 after going through severe financial trouble, we mourned its baroque dementia. But today, Sacha Walkhoff, his assistant of 17 years, is in charge. “We are going to run the house very differently than we once did,” said Walkhoff, “we are currently developing lots of licenses, and are starting by relaunching Lacroix homme. We’ll wait a little longer to restart women.” The line, shown through a presentation at the Maria Luisa boutique themed around "migrating boys," was for elegant globetrotters: Suits with flowery seams and lining, spurts of color and button badges. “Lacroix, Chapter Two” as Walkhoff put it. Bernhard Willhelm did his usual nutty number: the Solomon de Rotschild private mansion in Paris was taken over and transformed into a gigantic performance that looked like Willy Wonka going off to the jungle.
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PARIS--Lacroix is back, ladies and gentlemen--sans Christian, alas. When the house closed in 2009 after going through severe financial trouble, we mourned its baroque dementia. But today, Sacha Walkhoff, his assistant of 17 years, is in charge. “We are going to run the house very differently than we once did,” said Walkhoff, “we are currently developing lots of licenses, and are starting by relaunching Lacroix homme. We’ll wait a little longer to restart women.” The line, shown through a presentation at the Maria Luisa boutique themed around "migrating boys," was for elegant globetrotters: Suits with flowery seams and lining, spurts of color and button badges. “Lacroix, Chapter Two” as Walkhoff put it. Bernhard Willhelm did his usual nutty number: the Solomon de Rotschild private mansion in Paris was taken over and transformed into a gigantic performance that looked like Willy Wonka going off to the jungle.
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PARIS--Lacroix is back, ladies and gentlemen--sans

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Bernhard Willhelm did his usual nutty number: the Solomon de Rotschild private mansion in Paris was taken over and transformed into a gigantic performance that looked like Willy Wonka going off to the jungle.

Although the clothes weren’t exactly the center of the show, we remember cello tape, fluo, spandex and face paint. Coming out of the show, we heard photographers complain that it was impossible to shoot the clothes. We pondered loud presentations: yea or nay? Sure, they’re fun, but are they a trick to distract you from the actual garments?

Photo by Imaxtree.

Photo by Imaxtree.

Ann Demeulemeester has a crush on Edward Scissorhands--or at least that what we concluded when we saw an army of boys with mad hair extensions and gardening-inspired gloves. The collection was dark yet soft: transparent silks, navies and oranges dominated the show. Deconstructed suits and waistcoats were punctuated by spots, dots, and lines. Fit for any Tim Burton fan.