Viktor & Rolf Men's Fall 2011: Don't Be Embarrassed to Wear Your Jammies

PARIS--My favorite thing about the Viktor & Rolf show, which took place yesterday at 9:30am (anything starting before noon in Paris is rare), is that it started with a boy coming out in his jammies. Of course, it wasn’t a boy, it was a model, and they weren’t jammies, they were knitted, featureless trousers and a matching top, but it called to mind pajamas, or the phys-ed uniform at a Soviet school, or my friend’s fashion project, The Grey Sweatsuit Revolution. And I kind of loved it. (The distance between these trousers and your long-johns is narrow, but that doesn’t mean they’re not cool). The Dutchmen have taken note of European woes—all is conservative and tight—but the economy is doing just fine, that you very much, so there are notes of playfulness, and celebration too.
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
1
PARIS--My favorite thing about the Viktor & Rolf show, which took place yesterday at 9:30am (anything starting before noon in Paris is rare), is that it started with a boy coming out in his jammies. Of course, it wasn’t a boy, it was a model, and they weren’t jammies, they were knitted, featureless trousers and a matching top, but it called to mind pajamas, or the phys-ed uniform at a Soviet school, or my friend’s fashion project, The Grey Sweatsuit Revolution. And I kind of loved it. (The distance between these trousers and your long-johns is narrow, but that doesn’t mean they’re not cool). The Dutchmen have taken note of European woes—all is conservative and tight—but the economy is doing just fine, that you very much, so there are notes of playfulness, and celebration too.
Image Title2

PARIS--My favorite thing about the Viktor & Rolf show, which took place yesterday at 9:30am (anything starting before noon in Paris is rare), is that it started with a boy coming out in his jammies. Of course, it wasn’t a boy, it was a model, and they weren’t jammies, they were knitted, featureless trousers and a matching top, but it called to mind pajamas, or the phys-ed uniform at a Soviet school, or my friend’s fashion project, The Grey Sweatsuit Revolution. And I kind of loved it. (The distance between these trousers and your long-johns is narrow, but that doesn’t mean they’re not cool).

The Dutchmen have taken note of European woes—all is conservative and tight—but the economy is doing just fine, that you very much, so there are notes of playfulness, and celebration too.

Another woolen pairing, this time in brown, came with a jacket--two-button with a steep lapel--and upturned cuffs; it was kind of brilliant, in a casually progressive way. Their suits cut a sharp silhouette, and play with their formalism, toying between pointed and shawl lapels. I also liked their trench coats, cinched high and forgoing the traditional button scheme, as well as the heavier duty overcoats, overflowing with shearling and boasting cowl necks that rose up to the nostrils.

The misses, although few (or perhaps due to this fact) were particularly notable. The plaid suit and overcoat, fit for the silliest sartorialists on Carnaby Street, stuck out, as did a mismatched sweater thing, that somehow combined five different knits and leather.

Still, not bad for first thing in the morning.

**All photos: Imaxtree.