ADAM Fall 2011: Native American Inspired

Here's a recipe for commercial success: Start by thinking about your actual, real life customer. Add a dash of niche, specific inspiration, but don't get too heavy handed. Split the vision up into separates. Lather, rinse, repeat. For fall, Adam Lippes did just that, churning out yet another ADAM collection that was "wearable" in only the way that fashion people say it, as if surprised when clothes are actually accessible. "The starting point in designing every collection is the woman who wears my clothes," Lippes' show notes explained. Past that, his inspiration was a recent trip to the National Museum of the American Indian. But sticking to the recipe, Lippes added just the right dash of native, not a dousing.
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Here's a recipe for commercial success: Start by thinking about your actual, real life customer. Add a dash of niche, specific inspiration, but don't get too heavy handed. Split the vision up into separates. Lather, rinse, repeat. For fall, Adam Lippes did just that, churning out yet another ADAM collection that was "wearable" in only the way that fashion people say it, as if surprised when clothes are actually accessible. "The starting point in designing every collection is the woman who wears my clothes," Lippes' show notes explained. Past that, his inspiration was a recent trip to the National Museum of the American Indian. But sticking to the recipe, Lippes added just the right dash of native, not a dousing.
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Here's a recipe for commercial success:

Start by thinking about your actual, real life customer. Add a dash of niche, specific inspiration, but don't get too heavy handed. Split the vision up into separates. Lather, rinse, repeat.

For fall, Adam Lippes did just that, churning out yet another ADAM collection that was "wearable" in only the way that fashion people say it, as if surprised when clothes are actually accessible.

"The starting point in designing every collection is the woman who wears my clothes," Lippes' show notes explained. Past that, his inspiration was a recent trip to the National Museum of the American Indian. But sticking to the recipe, Lippes added just the right dash of native, not a dousing. Heaviest references came in the outerwear (wool ponchos and anoraks) and skirts (striped in alternating bands of fur and feathers). But when coupled with his easily sellable separates (hand knit sweaters, wide leg pants, and of-the-moment chambray shirts), these pieces weaved a thread of Native American through the collection without snagging it on a creative vision too niche for his laid back, real girl customer. In that way, Lippes managed to pay homage to the Native American culture-- while still remaining true to his tribe of customers.

**All photos: IMAXTREE