Honor Fall 2011: Bound Movement

Honor designer Giovanna Randall burst onto the New York fashion scene in a big way. The med school dropout just showed her second collection and her first ever runway show--but when Alexa Chung is sitting front row, you know you're making the right kind of buzz. And the collection lived up to the hype. We were already big fans of Honor's ultra feminine and dreamy aesthetic after her first presentation last season, and her fall 2011 collection confirmed our love. It was elegant and thoughtful and luxe with a '70s vibe that wasn't overbearing. Pants were flowy and wide-legged, paired with tunic tops with a thick belt. Long sleeved column dresses that were cinched at the waist billowed as the models walked (my personal favorite). Even though most looks were paired with adorable Repetto oxfords or patent loafers, the clothes made each already tall and thin model look taller and thinner. In fact, the skirts that hit just above the ankle looked even chicer because they were paired with flats. The color palette shifted in blocks from muted in putties and black at the start to a shock of raspberry on printed tent minidresses with deep pockets followed by rich emerald on a coat and in chiffon dresses to finish the show. When I spoke with Randall after the show to ask how she felt she said she could sum up her feelings about the show in three words: "A fucking miracle."
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Leah Chernikoff
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Honor designer Giovanna Randall burst onto the New York fashion scene in a big way. The med school dropout just showed her second collection and her first ever runway show--but when Alexa Chung is sitting front row, you know you're making the right kind of buzz. And the collection lived up to the hype. We were already big fans of Honor's ultra feminine and dreamy aesthetic after her first presentation last season, and her fall 2011 collection confirmed our love. It was elegant and thoughtful and luxe with a '70s vibe that wasn't overbearing. Pants were flowy and wide-legged, paired with tunic tops with a thick belt. Long sleeved column dresses that were cinched at the waist billowed as the models walked (my personal favorite). Even though most looks were paired with adorable Repetto oxfords or patent loafers, the clothes made each already tall and thin model look taller and thinner. In fact, the skirts that hit just above the ankle looked even chicer because they were paired with flats. The color palette shifted in blocks from muted in putties and black at the start to a shock of raspberry on printed tent minidresses with deep pockets followed by rich emerald on a coat and in chiffon dresses to finish the show. When I spoke with Randall after the show to ask how she felt she said she could sum up her feelings about the show in three words: "A fucking miracle."
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Honor designer Giovanna Randall burst onto the New York fashion scene in a big way. The med school dropout just showed her second collection and her first ever runway show--but when Alexa Chung is sitting front row, you know you're making the right kind of buzz.

And the collection lived up to the hype. We were already big fans of Honor's ultra feminine and dreamy aesthetic after her first presentation last season, and her fall 2011 collection confirmed our love. It was elegant and thoughtful and luxe with a '70s vibe that wasn't overbearing. Pants were flowy and wide-legged, paired with tunic tops with a thick belt. Long sleeved column dresses that were cinched at the waist billowed as the models walked (my personal favorite). Even though most looks were paired with adorable Repetto oxfords or patent loafers, the clothes made each already tall and thin model look taller and thinner. In fact, the skirts that hit just above the ankle looked even chicer because they were paired with flats. The color palette shifted in blocks from muted in putties and black at the start to a shock of raspberry on printed tent minidresses with deep pockets followed by rich emerald on a coat and in chiffon dresses to finish the show.

When I spoke with Randall after the show to ask how she felt she said she could sum up her feelings about the show in three words: "A fucking miracle." I'm inclined to think it was a lot of hard work on the part of Randall and her team, as well Leith Clark, who took a break from editing Lula mag to style Randall's show (it was hear idea to use the nude and putty colored Repetto flats--she said Yves Saint Laurent used to wear them). The concept of the show, Randall explained, was "bound movement," which came from an experience Randall had as a child. The long-winded story went something like this: When Randall was little she begged her grandmother to take her to Caldor's (like K-Mart) to get a gumball machine she desperately wanted, only when she got there the aisle of gumball machines was empty save one that was falling out of the box and lying next to a half-eaten balogna sandwich. From there Randall came to the idea of a Parisian, who is displaced, and all she has is Caldor--so how does she keep Paris within her when she's in a place devoid of inspiration? If she could get her hand's on Honor's fall 2011 collection she'd do just fine in Topeka or Amarillo or anywhere in between.