Louis Vuitton Fall 2011: Kate Moss, Naomi Campbell and More Walk Marc Jacobs' "Fetish" Show

Leave it to Marc Jacobs to put on the most lavish and possibly most expensive show of Paris fashion week for Louis Vuitton. The tent for the show at the Cour Carrée du Louvre was all in black and surrounded by big black balloons--a hint that something playful and naughty was to come. Inside a fleet of women dressed as chambermaids--white collars, black skirts, feather dusters--escorted editors and buyers to their seats and served coffee and champagne (whichever you prefer to start your day off with). The runway was more of a stage--a black glossy square with a set of three ornate old-fashioned cage elevators at the center. You can guess where this is going: models, all 67 of them (including Kate Moss, Raquel Zimmerman, Naomi Campbell and Amber Valletta), entered the runway from the elevators, which were operated, naturally, by uniformed older gentlemen who opened the door every time a model ascended.
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Leah Chernikoff
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Leave it to Marc Jacobs to put on the most lavish and possibly most expensive show of Paris fashion week for Louis Vuitton. The tent for the show at the Cour Carrée du Louvre was all in black and surrounded by big black balloons--a hint that something playful and naughty was to come. Inside a fleet of women dressed as chambermaids--white collars, black skirts, feather dusters--escorted editors and buyers to their seats and served coffee and champagne (whichever you prefer to start your day off with). The runway was more of a stage--a black glossy square with a set of three ornate old-fashioned cage elevators at the center. You can guess where this is going: models, all 67 of them (including Kate Moss, Raquel Zimmerman, Naomi Campbell and Amber Valletta), entered the runway from the elevators, which were operated, naturally, by uniformed older gentlemen who opened the door every time a model ascended.
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Leave it to Marc Jacobs to put on the most lavish and possibly most expensive show of Paris fashion week for Louis Vuitton.

The tent for the show at the Cour Carrée du Louvre was all in black and surrounded by big black balloons--a hint that something playful and naughty was to come. Inside a fleet of women dressed as chambermaids--white collars, black skirts, feather dusters--escorted editors and buyers to their seats and served coffee and champagne (whichever you prefer to start your day off with). The runway was more of a stage--a black glossy square with a set of three ornate old-fashioned cage elevators at the center. You can guess where this is going: models, all 67 of them (including Kate Moss, Raquel Zimmerman, Naomi Campbell and Amber Valletta), entered the runway from the elevators, which were operated, naturally, by uniformed older gentlemen who opened the door every time a model ascended.

Oh, so about the actual show. The definition of "fetish" was printed in bold on Vuitton's line sheets. And Jacobs knows that it's all about the accessories, particularly at a place like Vuitton, so his collection centered around the Lockit bag. "In this season's Louis Vuitton collection 'Fetish' and 'Fashion are explored through their interchangeable meanings...At the heart of this dialogue, as if often the case for both fetish and fashion, is a magical object: the Lockit handbag," the line sheet read. Almost every model carried a variation on the Lockit, and to fetishize it--to show the wearer's devotion to her handbag--Jacobs cleverly handcuffed some of his girls to their bags (handcuffs cast in 18-carat gold and occasionally diamond encrusted, of course).

As for the clothes, they actually reminded me a lot of Jacobs' eponymous collection. Jacobs' own collection presented in New York had a militaristic, severe feel, and his collection for Vuitton had obvious military inspirations: models wore captain's caps with thick wool military coats, blouses with stiff jodhpurs. Textures--patent leather, lacquered python, shearling, guipure, and shiny paillettes, also in python--recalled the materials from his New York collection, too (albeit without polyester and fabric trickery). But in keeping with the whole fetish thing, there were corsets, body suits embellished with fur and sequined embroidery, and high waisted lingerie boy shorts (the line sheets called them "pants" but they were more like panties) paired with nylon thigh highs.

And as if all of that showmanship weren't enough, the one and only Kate Moss closed the show while smoking a cigarette.

**All photos: Imaxtree.