Nicolas Andreas Taralis Fall 2011: En Garde!

PARIS--“A designer should know how to stay true to himself and still manage to introduce new elements, to create a continuity and coherence,” Nicolas Andreas Taralis told us minutes after his show at Palais de Tokyo last night. The Canadian designer, who worked under Hedi Slimane for years and as head designer for Cerruti, relaunched his own label last year--in this short space of time, he has already established his signature silhouette. Last night's show--set to sounds that sounded like they came from a convent and then morphed into punk rock--saw men and women on the same catwalk--half Goth, half dandies--and everyone looked comfortable in slick cuts paired with light, flowy layers. It was sharp tailoring mixed with touches of sportswear. Boys wore lipstick, girls had their hair slicked back. Taralis introduced a theme of copper stains that looked like blood (who knew American Psycho could be such a becoming look?), with ruffled collars and extra long shirts. He added pin stripes suits, Victorian cuts on vests and blazers, and sparkly wool. These are clothes fit for a dual.
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PARIS--“A designer should know how to stay true to himself and still manage to introduce new elements, to create a continuity and coherence,” Nicolas Andreas Taralis told us minutes after his show at Palais de Tokyo last night. The Canadian designer, who worked under Hedi Slimane for years and as head designer for Cerruti, relaunched his own label last year--in this short space of time, he has already established his signature silhouette. Last night's show--set to sounds that sounded like they came from a convent and then morphed into punk rock--saw men and women on the same catwalk--half Goth, half dandies--and everyone looked comfortable in slick cuts paired with light, flowy layers. It was sharp tailoring mixed with touches of sportswear. Boys wore lipstick, girls had their hair slicked back. Taralis introduced a theme of copper stains that looked like blood (who knew American Psycho could be such a becoming look?), with ruffled collars and extra long shirts. He added pin stripes suits, Victorian cuts on vests and blazers, and sparkly wool. These are clothes fit for a dual.
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PARIS--“A designer should know how to stay true to himself and still manage to introduce new elements, to create a continuity and coherence,” Nicolas Andreas Taralis told us minutes after his show at Palais de Tokyo last night.

The Canadian designer, who worked under Hedi Slimane for years and as head designer for Cerruti, relaunched his own label last year--in this short space of time, he has already established his signature silhouette.

Last night's show--set to sounds that sounded like they came from a convent and then morphed into punk rock--saw men and women on the same catwalk--half Goth, half dandies--and everyone looked comfortable in slick cuts paired with light, flowy layers. It was sharp tailoring mixed with touches of sportswear. Boys wore lipstick, girls had their hair slicked back. Taralis introduced a theme of copper stains that looked like blood (who knew American Psycho could be such a becoming look?), with ruffled collars and extra long shirts. He added pin stripes suits, Victorian cuts on vests and blazers, and sparkly wool. These are clothes fit for a dual. As always for Taralis, there was a subtle balance between concealing and revealing: while all necks and legs were covered, you’d sometimes see an entire breast pop out of a shirt. Long skirts had slits up to the waist, and entire patches of fabric were sometimes removed from the collar line of blouses. Elements of sportswear appeared in tank tops in stretchy cotton with paper-thin hoods.

**All images: Imaxtree.