Sharon Wauchob Fall 2011: French Embroideries for an International Woman

Sharon Wauchob is Irish, attended London’s Central St Martins school, designs for Edun in New York and shows her own eponymous line in Paris. So who is the Wauchob woman? “It’s more a matter of using what is available and specific to the country," Sharon told us backstage after the show, “For instance France has incredible, unique lace and pleating techniques.” Indeed, Sharon, who previously worked on textiles at Louis Vuitton is growing to be an expert at fabric treatment. Her collection, shown last night in Paris’ Beaux-Arts school, is a game of laces, playing on the subtlety of layering two sheer fabrics, contrasting fur and fishnet-like broderie anglaise.
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Sharon Wauchob is Irish, attended London’s Central St Martins school, designs for Edun in New York and shows her own eponymous line in Paris. So who is the Wauchob woman? “It’s more a matter of using what is available and specific to the country," Sharon told us backstage after the show, “For instance France has incredible, unique lace and pleating techniques.” Indeed, Sharon, who previously worked on textiles at Louis Vuitton is growing to be an expert at fabric treatment. Her collection, shown last night in Paris’ Beaux-Arts school, is a game of laces, playing on the subtlety of layering two sheer fabrics, contrasting fur and fishnet-like broderie anglaise.
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Sharon Wauchob is Irish, attended London’s Central St Martins school, designs for Edun in New York and shows her own eponymous line in Paris.

So who is the Wauchob woman? “It’s more a matter of using what is available and specific to the country," Sharon told us backstage after the show, “For instance France has incredible, unique lace and pleating techniques.”

Indeed, Sharon, who previously worked on textiles at Louis Vuitton is growing to be an expert at fabric treatment. Her collection, shown last night in Paris’ Beaux-Arts school, is a game of laces, playing on the subtlety of layering two sheer fabrics, contrasting fur and fishnet-like broderie anglaise. Her woman is decidedly a working one: this chic, office wear line can make one look ready for a promotion, but also drop dead irresistible at a cocktail party.

We particularly liked a dress with a top of finely knitted navy wool and a bottom composed entirely of miniature golden rings--half belly dancer, half corporate queen.

Another look, more evening attire, consisted of an extra large military pleated dress with a body conscious lace slip underneath, tightened by a leather belt.

The recurring silhouette was straight leg trousers (or were we seeing a very slight boot cut?) with pointy stiletto, suit jacket worn with a skinny high waisted belt, and black gloves with splashes of red. As always, Wauchob made an interesting use of fur: fox pieces, but also trousers in rich browns.

What’s the key difference with Edun, you ponder? “The woman isn’t necessarily radically different, she might just be in a different mood, or at a different time of the day,” said Wauchob.

**All photos: Imaxtree