Why Isn't The Fashion Community Condemning Galliano?

Yesterday Vogue Italia EIC Franca Sozzani took to her blog to voice her thoughts about Galliano's anti-Semitic tirade caught on video:
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Leah Chernikoff
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Yesterday Vogue Italia EIC Franca Sozzani took to her blog to voice her thoughts about Galliano's anti-Semitic tirade caught on video:
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Yesterday Vogue Italia EIC Franca Sozzani took to her blog to voice her thoughts about Galliano's anti-Semitic tirade caught on video:

"We aren’t clear about one thing: the video starts right at the moment when Galliano launches his tirade. So one or the other must be true: either whoever took it was a master of timing, or what we are seeing is a video created for this purpose. In other words, possibly it was made by holding the mobile in the hand waiting for the celebrity – evidently provoked – to explode...An explosion was more than probable when you add together the amount of alcohol Galliano had consumed and the provocations of the people speaking to him."

Not that she thinks what he did is OK, of course--"we condemn the extremely seriously racist content of what he said (there’s even a hypothetical apology for Nazism)," she writes, but then goes on to suggest the whole video, now responsible for Galliano's firing, was just "journalistic scandal," a means for a lowly journo to cash in.

And when the Telegraph's Hilary Alexander interviewed Giorgio Armani after his show on Monday to get his thoughts on Galliano he told her, through a translator, "I'm very very sorry for him..I'm very sorry they videotaped him without him knowing."

Armani and Sozzani sound like they're making excuses for Galliano's gross statements--or at least minimizing the impact of what he said--and that's wrong. What Galliano said on that video was disgusting and incredibly offensive. As a Jew, I felt deeply disturbed after hearing Galliano's hateful rant. Jews in other parts of the world, and people of other races and creeds face discrimination on a daily basis. It is not OK.

Maybe designers and editors feel it isn't their place. But I was relieved that Natalie Portman, the face of Miss Dior Cherie, took a stand and made a statement last night expressing her deep "disgust" over Galliano's comments and said she would "not be associated with Mr. Galliano in any way." Granted Portman had more of a reason to make a statement considering her contract with Dior, but I, for one, am disappointed by the reactions voiced by the fashion community so far.