Pat Field On Her Partnership With Kotex, and What a Tampon Would Look Like If She Designed It

Ladies, are you put off because your feminine hygiene products are too boring? Does your pad or tampon not reflect the kind of girl you really are? Well, as you might have heard by now, Kotex and Pat Field have teamed up to make your pads and tampons less clinical and more colorful. Yesterday Kotex hosted an event with Pat Field to kick off the launch of their new campaign "Ban the Bland" which is all about inciting girls to take a stand against the "bland" institutional, boring, and plain white look of feminine care products. Field has partnered with Kotex to oversee a design competition which invites women to design their own pad on www.BantheBland.com. You can design one right now--the contest runs through June 29. Then three finalists, voted on by the masses, get the chance to meet with Field who will mentor them and help them hone their designs for a new U by Kotex pad that will make it to market in some incarnation (I say "some incarnation" because some design elements--glitter for example--are just impracticable or impossible to incorporate and have the product still function). Plus, the winner gets to attend a show at New York Fashion Week. And while Field will only serve as a pad-design mentor and not design one herself, she has designed a set of tins to carry said pads in. But, the ever unfiltered Field added, the colorful tins are also good for carrying anything--she said she'd store her pills and cigarettes in them. We sat down with the legendary Sex and the City costume designer to ask just how on earth this strangest of collaborations came about, and if she could design "femme care" (as we learned it's called in the biz), what would it look like.
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Leah Chernikoff
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Ladies, are you put off because your feminine hygiene products are too boring? Does your pad or tampon not reflect the kind of girl you really are? Well, as you might have heard by now, Kotex and Pat Field have teamed up to make your pads and tampons less clinical and more colorful. Yesterday Kotex hosted an event with Pat Field to kick off the launch of their new campaign "Ban the Bland" which is all about inciting girls to take a stand against the "bland" institutional, boring, and plain white look of feminine care products. Field has partnered with Kotex to oversee a design competition which invites women to design their own pad on www.BantheBland.com. You can design one right now--the contest runs through June 29. Then three finalists, voted on by the masses, get the chance to meet with Field who will mentor them and help them hone their designs for a new U by Kotex pad that will make it to market in some incarnation (I say "some incarnation" because some design elements--glitter for example--are just impracticable or impossible to incorporate and have the product still function). Plus, the winner gets to attend a show at New York Fashion Week. And while Field will only serve as a pad-design mentor and not design one herself, she has designed a set of tins to carry said pads in. But, the ever unfiltered Field added, the colorful tins are also good for carrying anything--she said she'd store her pills and cigarettes in them. We sat down with the legendary Sex and the City costume designer to ask just how on earth this strangest of collaborations came about, and if she could design "femme care" (as we learned it's called in the biz), what would it look like.
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Ladies, are you put off because your feminine hygiene products are too boring? Does your pad or tampon not reflect the kind of girl you really are? Well, as you might have heard by now, Kotex and Pat Field have teamed up to make your pads and tampons less clinical and more colorful.

Yesterday Kotex hosted an event with Pat Field to kick off the launch of their new campaign "Ban the Bland" which is all about inciting girls to take a stand against the "bland" institutional, boring, and plain white look of feminine care products. Field has partnered with Kotex to oversee a design competition which invites women to design their own pad on www.BantheBland.com. You can design one right now--the contest runs through June 29. Then three finalists, voted on by the masses, get the chance to meet with Field who will mentor them and help them hone their designs for a new U by Kotex pad that will make it to market in some incarnation (I say "some incarnation" because some design elements--glitter for example--are just impracticable or impossible to incorporate and have the product still function). Plus, the winner gets to attend a show at New York Fashion Week.

And while Field will only serve as a pad-design mentor and not design one herself, she has designed a set of tins to carry said pads in. But, the ever unfiltered Field added, the colorful tins are also good for carrying anything--she said she'd store her pills and cigarettes in them.

We sat down with the legendary Sex and the City costume designer to ask just how on earth this strangest of collaborations came about, and if she could design "femme care" (as we learned it's called in the biz), what would it look like.

Why did you decide to partner with Kotex? I was a good casting. I think women respect me because I respect them. And Kotex provided me with a platform to talk to all the women of the world and I want to hear them. We're already up close and personal from Sex and the City. I thought, OK, I can justify this, I can get behind this. I think it's a good idea because it offers women an exercise in creativity. Who knows, maybe it will be the start of your portfolio.

Did you have any hesitations? My only criticism of the whole situation is to stop calling women girls. If you want to catch their attention you must speak with them on an equal level eye-to-eye, not down to them like children.

How do you connect to this project? Why do pads need to have a design element when they'll just get, um, bled on? I want to do everything with the most style that I can. I want my environments to please my eyes, my ears, and make me happy so I can burst out like a supernova. So for me, putting a design element to a Kotex pad, I would put a design element to anything because I don't want anything around me that's ugly and boring. Period. Anything I can make beautiful I'll make beautiful.

What would your pad look like? Well, I wouldn't wear a pad I would wear a tampon. The pink and black group are hot. I like the black ones especially. The punk ones I like. But for example if I were going to merchandise a tampon line I would have black, purple, blue and a more magenta-ish pink and I would call it "jewel tone woman."

The designer series of U by Kotex pads coming out for back to school comes in different categories--"BoHo, Poptimistic, Freestyle and Punk Glam." You obviously like the punk category... Preppies. I don't know who they are. They're just some bland group in the nebulae. I know that the preppies are there, but that's for the men. Charlotte was always the most popular for the men. The men will go straight for the preppy because that's the woman he can bring home to mama. He's got this dream he has to bring this girl home to his mom and he can't bring home the hooker, or the professor smarty pants who will be too strong for the mama.

What would Charlotte's tampon look like? It would look like flowers and gingham and Barbie dolls.

Are you looking forward to consulting with the finalists? I want to share their excitement. You might call me a Dracula because the energy of youth, I love it, I identify with it because I have it.