Check Out Gaga As a Three Headed Little Monster on the Cover of V, Plus Excerpts From Her Defensive, Ranty Debut Column for the Mag

So that image of Gaga with her face covered in sequins to look like a butterfly? Not the cover of this V's "Asian issue." Turns out it was only a third of the cover of V's issue 71, on newsstands today. Gaga's column for the high fashion glossy also debuted today. It's really long. And defensive. And kinda pretentious. Some highlights:
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So that image of Gaga with her face covered in sequins to look like a butterfly? Not the cover of this V's "Asian issue." Turns out it was only a third of the cover of V's issue 71, on newsstands today. Gaga's column for the high fashion glossy also debuted today. It's really long. And defensive. And kinda pretentious. Some highlights:
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So that image of Gaga with her face covered in sequins to look like a butterfly? Not the cover of this V's "Asian issue." Turns out it was only a third of the cover of V's issue 71, on newsstands today.

Gaga's column for the high fashion glossy also debuted today. It's really long. And defensive. And kinda pretentious.

Some highlights:

I myself can look at almost any hemline, silhouette, beadwork, or heel architecture and tell you very precisely who designed it first, what French painter they stole it from, and how many designers reinvented it after them, and what cultural and musical movement parented the birth, death, and resurrection of that particular trend. So dear critics and bullies: get your library cards out, because I'm about to do a reading.

As someone who references and annotates her work vigilantly, I am putting all of you on notice. I've done my homework, have you?

I have a passionate understanding of the history of many of the references that not only I have reinspired, but have been reinterpreted over centuries of fashion: where they came from, what they meant, and specifically how they became modern again. I have concurrently shows that I could "read you" in this subject, but I would rather reckon with the fact that many are clinging tightly to culture divisiveness and leaving home without library cards.

Just like sometimes Picasso was Matisse's Mondrian, and vice versa. Bowie is often my Mondrian, as are Michael Jackson, Prince, Lita Ford, and Madonna. Mugler is my silhouette's Mondrian, Cindy Crawford is my sexuality's, Kermit is my whimsy's, and, in my "Born This Way" video, two of my Mondrians were Francis Bacon and Slavdor Dali. In a lot of ways, the "idea" of being obsessed with art is my Mondrian. Just like Campbell's Tomato Soup was Warhol's Mondrian, and Marilyn Monro and Maripol were Madonna's. I am obsesed with all the authors in the library of pop culture.

I am an obsessed pop cultural expert. And perhaps, between my music, performance art, and this column, I will be remembered as such.

Check out the rest of the Inez and Vinoodh shot editorial, courtesy of V: