Jake Davis Directs Vanessa Carlton's Super Stylish New Video

In an age where latex unitards, neon-colored hair and bras that shoot either bullets or whipped cream (Gaga, Katy Perry, respectively) have become standard fare for songstresses, it's refreshing to see that at least one female singer isn't afraid to be, well, normal. Enter Vanessa Carlton, whose just-debuted video for her latest single "Carousel" takes a decidedly different approach, drawing on personal style, street wear, and vintage clothing as inspiration (instead of say, bondage, aliens and childrens' toys). But don't take the word "normal" to mean "boring"--Carlton's video has some serious fashion cred.
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In an age where latex unitards, neon-colored hair and bras that shoot either bullets or whipped cream (Gaga, Katy Perry, respectively) have become standard fare for songstresses, it's refreshing to see that at least one female singer isn't afraid to be, well, normal. Enter Vanessa Carlton, whose just-debuted video for her latest single "Carousel" takes a decidedly different approach, drawing on personal style, street wear, and vintage clothing as inspiration (instead of say, bondage, aliens and childrens' toys). But don't take the word "normal" to mean "boring"--Carlton's video has some serious fashion cred.

In an age where latex unitards, neon-colored hair and bras that shoot either bullets or whipped cream (Gaga, Katy Perry, respectively) have become standard fare for songstresses, it's refreshing to see that at least one female singer isn't afraid to be, well, normal. Enter Vanessa Carlton, whose just-debuted video for her latest single "Carousel" takes a decidedly different approach, drawing on personal style, street wear, and vintage clothing as inspiration (instead of say, bondage, aliens and childrens' toys). But don't take the word "normal" to mean "boring"--Carlton's video has some serious fashion cred.

For one, it was shot by director du jour Jake Davis, whose evocative street style videos have garnered attention from editors and branding execs alike and whose own on-point fashion sense has won him a loyal fan base among menswear aficionados. Davis' signature "Test Shot" aesthetic, which the director put to work for Fashionista's It Girl series, can be felt throughout Carousel--and like all of his work, the video is equal parts high fashion and street style/ professionally produced video and intimate portraiture.

The video's stylist, Tracey Mouton, has a similar approach when it comes to dressing her clients: Though she's styled big name stars on the red carpet (Julia Stiles and Vanessa Carlton among them) and worked with magazines like Elle and Nylon, Moulton's philosophy is all about authenticity, sticking to a client's personal style, and eschewing everything else.

All of these elements (plus the bucolic backdrop) combine to create a video that is both beautiful and sartorially inspiring--and best of all, features clothing we could actually, you know, wear.