The Fluoro Ball Was Kind of Like Prom Night For Fashion's Scenesters

The Museum of Art and Design played host to Monday night’s Rare Earth’s Fluorescent Ball, and dare we say it was a full on fashion prom complete with art nerds, wannabes, music geeks, and those ever-present popular kids. Throw in some fluoro outfits, (some good, some bad) and you have a Prosecco-filled Monday evening that certainly boggled Tyson Beckford’s mind. We spotted him observing the room from its sidelines with puzzled awe. Although the evening’s weather wasn’t up to par, energetic DJ sets by scenesters like Paul Sevigny and Chrissie Miller certainly lightened everyone's mood, especially the cork-wedge clad group of (probable) financiers whose bump-its and fist-pumping skills proved to be an unlikely start to a wild dance party. The event served as the museum’s young patrons gala with a sale of one-off fluorescent works including a light-up noose—any takers? Always Mister Popular, Paper's Luigi Tadini favored the video installations on display, “its always nice to see movement,” he attested. Aesthetic technician and designer Christian Cota--there to co-chair and cheer on contributing artist friend Anne Grauso--said, “You need light to make fluorescent come alive, it doesn’t always work with fashion.” Rather fitting as this was evident in a few choice attendees’ ensembles, though we won’t single out offenders.
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The Museum of Art and Design played host to Monday night’s Rare Earth’s Fluorescent Ball, and dare we say it was a full on fashion prom complete with art nerds, wannabes, music geeks, and those ever-present popular kids. Throw in some fluoro outfits, (some good, some bad) and you have a Prosecco-filled Monday evening that certainly boggled Tyson Beckford’s mind. We spotted him observing the room from its sidelines with puzzled awe. Although the evening’s weather wasn’t up to par, energetic DJ sets by scenesters like Paul Sevigny and Chrissie Miller certainly lightened everyone's mood, especially the cork-wedge clad group of (probable) financiers whose bump-its and fist-pumping skills proved to be an unlikely start to a wild dance party. The event served as the museum’s young patrons gala with a sale of one-off fluorescent works including a light-up noose—any takers? Always Mister Popular, Paper's Luigi Tadini favored the video installations on display, “its always nice to see movement,” he attested. Aesthetic technician and designer Christian Cota--there to co-chair and cheer on contributing artist friend Anne Grauso--said, “You need light to make fluorescent come alive, it doesn’t always work with fashion.” Rather fitting as this was evident in a few choice attendees’ ensembles, though we won’t single out offenders.
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The Museum of Art and Design played host to Monday night’s Rare Earth’s Fluorescent Ball, and dare we say it was a full on fashion prom complete with art nerds, wannabes, music geeks, and those ever-present popular kids. Throw in some fluoro outfits, (some good, some bad) and you have a Prosecco-filled Monday evening that certainly boggled Tyson Beckford’s mind. We spotted him observing the room from its sidelines with puzzled awe.

Although the evening’s weather wasn’t up to par, energetic DJ sets by scenesters like Paul Sevigny and Chrissie Miller certainly lightened everyone's mood, especially the cork-wedge clad group of (probable) financiers whose bump-its and fist-pumping skills proved to be an unlikely start to a wild dance party. The event served as the museum’s young patrons gala with a sale of one-off fluorescent works including a light-up noose—any takers? Always Mister Popular, Paper's Luigi Tadini favored the video installations on display, “its always nice to see movement,” he attested. Aesthetic technician and designer Christian Cota--there to co-chair and cheer on contributing artist friend Anne Grauso--said, “You need light to make fluorescent come alive, it doesn’t always work with fashion.” Rather fitting as this was evident in a few choice attendees’ ensembles, though we won’t single out offenders.

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Rounding out the night’s artsy crowd were the always Brooklyn-chic Vena Cava girls and photographer/Fashionista favorite Jeremy Kost, who revealed that he has “a book coming out in two weeks, and there’s actually going to be an exclusive with Bookmarc.”

As day-glo revelers began to funnel into the museum at around 10 (the event started at 7), the space’s middle school-esque perimeter of onlookers began to take center stage including a roster of internationals-- the night’s version of foreign exchangers. Waris Ahluwalia favored party gifts like light stick eyeglasses, a vision that made us wish for some sort of kick ass collaboration with the Middleton tribe.

It was a dizzying combination of fluorescent lights, clothing and niche cliques. All that was missing was a bit of 'N Sync background noise to help the crowd relive their far less glamorous yet equally gawky teenage years.