Christian Lacroix Men's Spring 2012: The Past is Past

PARIS--Needless to remind you that Christian left Lacroix in 2009 due to financial difficulties, (which were mainly because of its costly couture line). Last season, the house relaunched, led by Sacha Walckhoff, the founder’s assistant of 17 years, who had heavily contributed to just about every department of the brand. Now working only through licenses, Lacroix launched a menswear collection last season that were miles away from Christian’s once theatrical designs: wearable, elegant, the former’s designer’s loudness appeared only in discreet touches, on linings and collars. Last night in Lacroix’s flagship boutique in Paris’ left bank, Sacha presented a full-blow runway show, but a humble one nevertheless. The interior, currently going through renovations, had bare walls and floors, and felt like a chic squat party. On the outside, a simple sign hung stating "Lacroix: work in progress."
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PARIS--Needless to remind you that Christian left Lacroix in 2009 due to financial difficulties, (which were mainly because of its costly couture line). Last season, the house relaunched, led by Sacha Walckhoff, the founder’s assistant of 17 years, who had heavily contributed to just about every department of the brand. Now working only through licenses, Lacroix launched a menswear collection last season that were miles away from Christian’s once theatrical designs: wearable, elegant, the former’s designer’s loudness appeared only in discreet touches, on linings and collars. Last night in Lacroix’s flagship boutique in Paris’ left bank, Sacha presented a full-blow runway show, but a humble one nevertheless. The interior, currently going through renovations, had bare walls and floors, and felt like a chic squat party. On the outside, a simple sign hung stating "Lacroix: work in progress."
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PARIS--Needless to remind you that Christian left Lacroix in 2009 due to financial difficulties, (which were mainly because of its costly couture line).

Last season, the house relaunched, led by Sacha Walckhoff, the founder’s assistant of 17 years, who had heavily contributed to just about every department of the brand.

Now working only through licenses, Lacroix launched a menswear collection last season that were miles away from Christian’s once theatrical designs: wearable, elegant, the former’s designer’s loudness appeared only in discreet touches, on linings and collars.

Last night in Lacroix’s flagship boutique in Paris’ left bank, Sacha presented a full-blow runway show, but a humble one nevertheless. The interior, currently going through renovations, had bare walls and floors, and felt like a chic squat party. On the outside, a simple sign hung stating "Lacroix: work in progress."

The collection offered a functional line of suits, simple tops, and trousers, with references to the house’s glorious 80s: three quarters cycling trousers, cropped denim jackets, complete with crystals sewn onto jackets or pasted directly onto skin.

There was also a recurring use of quilted leather on which floral patterns were imprinted; these were used on jackets, but also sleeveless tops tied through a shoelace-like system at the back.

“This season, we had time to work with artisans,” Sacha told Fashionista at the end of the show, “and focused on traditional techniques and finishing.”

A little early for Lacroix to have a catwalk show? “It’s a crazy I know, but it felt right, especially in this space,” he said. Couture, or even womenswear, yes, that might have been too early--but menswear didn’t seem to infringe on Christian’s territory. “The past is the past. This is simply a new chapter beginning.”

**Photos by Imaxtree.