Erin by Erin Fetherston Resort/Holiday 2012: What A Girl Wants

Erin Fetherston is a girl's girl through and through, and for the resort/holiday collection she delivered exactly what the most feminine could desire. In the constant cycle of collections it's easy to overlook the purpose of a line, namely, to clothe the body. When searching for a New Year's dress or a light frock for a post-holiday vacation, it's likely that the search will lean more towards fun and functional than the conceptual artistry of the larger main collections. With Fetherston's diffusion line, Erin by Erin Fetherston, which debuted for fall 2011, she sought to give girls just that. "It wasn't so much a conceptual line, like the major spring and fall collections. I wanted to experiment with different fun fabrics but make something that could transition from holiday weather to spring," she said. Centering around staple party dresses at more affordable prices (no item exceeds $695, and the average price is about $375), the line is a perfect mix of transitional yet seasonal pieces and avoids the wear-it-once demon that may set you back more than a one-night dress should.
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
27
Erin Fetherston is a girl's girl through and through, and for the resort/holiday collection she delivered exactly what the most feminine could desire. In the constant cycle of collections it's easy to overlook the purpose of a line, namely, to clothe the body. When searching for a New Year's dress or a light frock for a post-holiday vacation, it's likely that the search will lean more towards fun and functional than the conceptual artistry of the larger main collections. With Fetherston's diffusion line, Erin by Erin Fetherston, which debuted for fall 2011, she sought to give girls just that. "It wasn't so much a conceptual line, like the major spring and fall collections. I wanted to experiment with different fun fabrics but make something that could transition from holiday weather to spring," she said. Centering around staple party dresses at more affordable prices (no item exceeds $695, and the average price is about $375), the line is a perfect mix of transitional yet seasonal pieces and avoids the wear-it-once demon that may set you back more than a one-night dress should.
Image Title20

Erin Fetherston is a girl's girl through and through, and for the resort/holiday collection she delivered exactly what the most feminine could desire. In the constant cycle of collections it's easy to overlook the purpose of a line, namely, to clothe the body. When searching for a New Year's dress or a light frock for a post-holiday vacation, it's likely that the search will lean more towards fun and functional than the conceptual artistry of the larger main collections.

With Fetherston's diffusion line, Erin by Erin Fetherston, which debuted for fall 2011, she sought to give girls just that. "It wasn't so much a conceptual line, like the major spring and fall collections. I wanted to experiment with different fun fabrics but make something that could transition from holiday weather to spring," she said. Centering around staple party dresses at more affordable prices (no item exceeds $695, and the average price is about $375), the line is a perfect mix of transitional yet seasonal pieces and avoids the wear-it-once demon that may set you back more than a one-night dress should.

Deep down, it's classic Fetherston--sheer organza frocks accented with lace; floating, one-shoulder tunics held by contrasting ribbons, mini jackets adorned with jewels--but there are departures, such as her use of horsehair to create halo-like layers on a dress (think a seriously toned-down version of Gaga's famous Armani gown) and miniskirts with multiple pleated, folded layers. She uses the fabric well--nothing is stiff, thick or cumbersome, but instead has beautifully tailored definition. The color scheme, too, is perfectly transitional: black, grey, pink, creme, turquoise, a few scattered zebra-stripe prints, all interchangeable for classy Christmas cocktails or a night on a Caribbean dance floor.

**All images courtesy of Erin Fetherston