The Scoop On A Real Photoshoot: Watching Garnier Fructis Style For Rolling Stone

Apparently, Gossip Girl isn't the only thing shot at the Empire Hotel. Chuck Bass’s stomping grounds is also a prime locale for photo shoots, like the Rolling Stone cover shoot we stopped by last Friday. But will that cover ever hit newsstands? Well, you decide. For the first time ever, Rolling Stone is putting their Choose the Cover competition in readers’ hands. One of two emerging artists—either The Sheepdogs or Lelia Broussard, who we hung with last week—will win not only their very own magazine cover but also a major record deal with Atlantic. But while the prizes are up totally up to voters, the cover shoot styling was left to the professionals. So we swung by the set to see what it's like creating an image for someone who doesn't yet have one (ie. not Bieber, or Bieber 2.0) and to see if the behind the scenes action really is all smiles, rainbows, and cover subjects eating cheeseburgers in blue jeans, like those front-of-book blurbs so diligently report.
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Apparently, Gossip Girl isn't the only thing shot at the Empire Hotel. Chuck Bass’s stomping grounds is also a prime locale for photo shoots, like the Rolling Stone cover shoot we stopped by last Friday. But will that cover ever hit newsstands? Well, you decide. For the first time ever, Rolling Stone is putting their Choose the Cover competition in readers’ hands. One of two emerging artists—either The Sheepdogs or Lelia Broussard, who we hung with last week—will win not only their very own magazine cover but also a major record deal with Atlantic. But while the prizes are up totally up to voters, the cover shoot styling was left to the professionals. So we swung by the set to see what it's like creating an image for someone who doesn't yet have one (ie. not Bieber, or Bieber 2.0) and to see if the behind the scenes action really is all smiles, rainbows, and cover subjects eating cheeseburgers in blue jeans, like those front-of-book blurbs so diligently report.
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Apparently, Gossip Girl isn't the only thing shot at the Empire Hotel. Chuck Bass’ stomping grounds is also a prime locale for photo shoots, like the Rolling Stone cover shoot we stopped by last Friday. But will that cover ever hit newsstands? Well, you decide. For the first time ever, Rolling Stone is putting their Choose the Cover competition in readers’ hands. One of two emerging artists--either The Sheepdogs or Lelia Broussard, who we hung with last week--will win not only their very own magazine cover but also a major record deal with Atlantic. But while the prizes are up totally up to voters, the cover shoot styling was left to the professionals. So we swung by the set to see what it's like creating an image for someone who doesn't yet have one (ie. not Bieber, or Bieber 2.0) and to see if the behind the scenes action really is all smiles, rainbows, and cover subjects eating cheeseburgers in blue jeans, like those front-of-book blurbs so diligently report. As Lelia sipped coffee, hairstylist Peter Butler dyed her hair for the first time. Ever. When he met her, Lelia had “kind of a grown-up mullet, but not in a cool way,” said Butler. For him, the real joy of the competition has been meeting "working bands that don't really have money to put into their image," and seeing how "open and receptive" they've been to professional advice. So yes, Lelia was, actually, all smiles as Butler prepped her--perhaps because she's not tired of the beautification process quite yet (although that might change if she wins the competition!). Until then, Lelia's just another gal who doesn't usually have access to professional hair people. So what's Bulter's tip for those of us who are in that same boat? If you're looking to switch your look "from office to night," Butler suggests "taking your hair and brushing it up into a ponytail on top of your head, all the while spritzing it with some hairspray" (Garnier Fructis Pure Clean is his fave, since it doesn't have any silicones, dyes, or parabens). Leave it for 10 or 15 minutes, take it down, and voila: instant volume, and a way to use hairspray that isn't all crunchy and pageantry. Before stepping off set to let Lelia do her thing (and you know, eat cheeseburgers in blue jeans), we could help but ask Butler one more hair question--what does he think of that whole not washing your hair thing? While he thinks it could be a good idea to skip shampoo to revitalize your hair, he draws the line at not washing at least with water to "stimulate the scalp and prevent it from getting all itchy and stinky."