Beyoncé Wears Mostly Unknown French Designers on Her New Fold-Out Album Cover

Beyoncé has never been afraid to take risks with her wardrobe choices, whether it's Thierry Mugler, who created her tour wardrobe in 2009, McQueen or Givenchy couture, both of which she wore in the "Girls" video; or even a Tina Knowles creation. Her looks are always daring and transformative. For her latest fold-out album cover, the Times notes, Beyoncé's signature bold looks are there, but the big designer names are not. On the cover, she wears a fur stole by up-and-coming French designer Alexandre Vauthier, who she also wore on stage at Glastonbury recently, where she outshined the mud-covered masses in a gold sequined number by the designer.
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Dhani Mau
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Beyoncé has never been afraid to take risks with her wardrobe choices, whether it's Thierry Mugler, who created her tour wardrobe in 2009, McQueen or Givenchy couture, both of which she wore in the "Girls" video; or even a Tina Knowles creation. Her looks are always daring and transformative. For her latest fold-out album cover, the Times notes, Beyoncé's signature bold looks are there, but the big designer names are not. On the cover, she wears a fur stole by up-and-coming French designer Alexandre Vauthier, who she also wore on stage at Glastonbury recently, where she outshined the mud-covered masses in a gold sequined number by the designer.
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Beyoncé has never been afraid to take risks with her wardrobe choices, whether it's Thierry Mugler, who created her tour wardrobe in 2009, McQueen or Givenchy couture, both of which she wore in the "Girls" video; or even a Tina Knowles creation. Her looks are always daring and transformative.

For her latest fold-out album cover, the Times notes, Beyoncé's signature bold looks are there, but the big designer names are not. On the cover, she wears a fur stole by up-and-coming French designer Alexandre Vauthier, who she also wore on stage at Glastonbury recently, where she outshined the mud-covered masses in a gold sequined number by the designer.

Inside, she also wears three-year-old label Julien Fournié, and on the cover of the "deuluxe" version of "4," a beaded dress by 27-year-old Maxime Simoens. The biggest name mentioned is Paris-based Azzedine Alaïa, who she wears on the back of both albums. Also, much of the cover art was shot by young French photographer Greg Gex.

Ms. Knowles’s creative director, Jenke-Ahmed Tailly, told the Times, “The album is a musical gumbo of everything Beyoncé likes. Each song really has a different personality so we decided to do the cover like an editorial for a magazine, with each song having its own style.” And of the decision to use lesser known designers: “It was important to Beyoncé that the choice of clothing not be about the brand but about the quality of the work.”

In April, Beyoncé and Jay-Z spent some time in Paris (famously spending $20,000/night on swanky accommodations), where Bey shot a spread for Harper's Bazaar and dazzled the city of lights with her chic outfits while out promoting "4." Perhaps the city's fashion talent made an impression on her as well.

We love that Bey is supporting emerging designers by thrusting them into the very strong spotlight that is always shining on her. Designers like Vaulthier and Fournié are breathing new life into Paris fashion--it's refreshing to see young designers succeed there, where the more established labels don't always make room for them.