Exclusive: Jours Après Lunes Designer Sophie Morin Responds To the Controversy Surrounding Her Lingerie Line for Girls

PARIS--Our article, published earlier this week, about French children’s underwear line ‘Jour après Lunes’--a line comprised of lingerie–inspired pieces meant to be worn indoors and out, over and under clothes--led to far more reactions than we had imagined--including stories in major outlets like the New York Daily News, the UK's Daily Mail, and TODAY.com. The brand’s founder and designer Sophie Morin wrote a letter to Fashionista explaining why she doesn’t think her brand promotes anything dodgy or creepy. Her main points: The “ worn dessus-dessous” (i.e. underwear worn as outerwear) that has raised an upheaval, is in fact just another way of saying that, for example, an undershirt, worn under a sweater to be warm in the winter, can be worn with jeans in the summer; or bodysuits, often worn by babies, can become an outfit--like mothers often do with their babies when it is hot...Triangle bras--and there are only two models in the collection--are worn as swimwear for youngest clients; these can be worn as a first brassiere for girls and even young women who aren’t looking for real support, since these don’t have underwire. There are no real bras in my collection. The transgenerational mother/daughter aspect of my brand doesn’t offer anything new and is identical to what lots of ready to wear brands offer. And about the photos of my brand, I’d like to specify that the articles in which they appeared were taken out of their context and were laid out to imply a sexy dimension that didn’t originally exist. All the photos show children playing children’s games, as we’ve all done.
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PARIS--Our article, published earlier this week, about French children’s underwear line ‘Jour après Lunes’--a line comprised of lingerie–inspired pieces meant to be worn indoors and out, over and under clothes--led to far more reactions than we had imagined--including stories in major outlets like the New York Daily News, the UK's Daily Mail, and TODAY.com. The brand’s founder and designer Sophie Morin wrote a letter to Fashionista explaining why she doesn’t think her brand promotes anything dodgy or creepy. Her main points: The “ worn dessus-dessous” (i.e. underwear worn as outerwear) that has raised an upheaval, is in fact just another way of saying that, for example, an undershirt, worn under a sweater to be warm in the winter, can be worn with jeans in the summer; or bodysuits, often worn by babies, can become an outfit--like mothers often do with their babies when it is hot...Triangle bras--and there are only two models in the collection--are worn as swimwear for youngest clients; these can be worn as a first brassiere for girls and even young women who aren’t looking for real support, since these don’t have underwire. There are no real bras in my collection. The transgenerational mother/daughter aspect of my brand doesn’t offer anything new and is identical to what lots of ready to wear brands offer. And about the photos of my brand, I’d like to specify that the articles in which they appeared were taken out of their context and were laid out to imply a sexy dimension that didn’t originally exist. All the photos show children playing children’s games, as we’ve all done.
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PARIS--Our article, published earlier this week, about French children’s underwear line ‘Jour après Lunes’--a line comprised of lingerie–inspired pieces meant to be worn indoors and out, over and under clothes--led to far more reactions than we had imagined--including stories in major outlets like the New York Daily News, the UK's Daily Mail, and TODAY.com.

The brand’s founder and designer Sophie Morin wrote a letter to Fashionista explaining why she doesn’t think her brand promotes anything dodgy or creepy.

Her main points:

The “ worn dessus-dessous” (i.e. underwear worn as outerwear) that has raised an upheaval, is in fact just another way of saying that, for example, an undershirt, worn under a sweater to be warm in the winter, can be worn with jeans in the summer; or bodysuits, often worn by babies, can become an outfit--like mothers often do with their babies when it is hot...Triangle bras--and there are only two models in the collection--are worn as swimwear for youngest clients; these can be worn as a first brassiere for girls and even young women who aren’t looking for real support, since these don’t have underwire. There are no real bras in my collection. The transgenerational mother/daughter aspect of my brand doesn’t offer anything new and is identical to what lots of ready to wear brands offer.

And about the photos of my brand, I’d like to specify that the articles in which they appeared were taken out of their context and were laid out to imply a sexy dimension that didn’t originally exist. All the photos show children playing children’s games, as we’ve all done. If you look at the details, you’ll often find elements of children’s games: dolls accessories, wooden animals, etc. A second reading is needed--no vulgar connotation. There is only one interpretation: children playing together, no more...The children aren’t wearing high heels nor nail polish nor lipstick. The hairdos are over the top, but so are children’s games. Yes, the models wear sunglasses, like every single kid. Yes, you see their stomachs and legs, like you do on the beach. Yes they wear necklaces inside the house, as do all little girls for fun. And finally, all the girls are professionals models and not Lolitas trying on women’s outfits. The direction of the photos is nothing weird, it is one frequently used by brands and magazines’ photo shoots.

I am extremely surprised by the current uproar around my brand, and am happy to answer any questions. I’d first like to say that my brand has nothing to do with the photos of Veronika Loubry’s daughter in Vogue, the confusion made by the press is totally wrong.

Read her letter in full.

Bonjour,

I am extremely surprised by the current uproar around my brand, and am happy to answer any questions. I’d first like to say that my brand has nothing to do with the photos of Veronika Loubry’s daughter in Vogue, the confusion made by the press is totally wrong.

Jours après Lunes was born out of finding a gap in children’s underwear: either uncomfortable, all-cotton pieces, or super sexy designs which were by-products of women’s underwear. There was no alternative for children--no underwear created in comfortable materials...

All I wanted to do was offer underwear that is soft and pleasant to wear, to offer sober pieces to girls between the ages of 14 and 20, that is suited for their age, and that wasn’t an extension of women’s labels, which are often vulgar.

The materials...have no vulgar connotation: they are totally opaque, nothing transparent. The style is inspired by children’s fashion, with spots, bows, etc.,

The “ worn dessus-dessous” (i.e. underwear worn as outerwear) that has raised an upheaval, is in fact just another way of saying that, for example, an undershirt, worn under a sweater to be warm in the winter, can be worn with jeans in the summer; or bodysuits, often worn by babies, can become an outfit--like mothers often do with their babies when it is hot.

Triangle bras--and there are only two models in the collection--are worn as swimwear for youngest clients; these can be worn as a first brassiere for girls and even young women who aren’t looking for real support, since these don’t have underwire. There are no real bras in my collection. The transgenerational mother/daughter aspect of my brand doesn’t offer anything new and is identical to what lots of ready to wear brands offer.

About the term ‘loungerie’: this term was invented by the style bureau, and is used by numerous brands and fashion articles. In my case it only means I create clothes that are more concealing, yet created with materials from the lingerie sector. I’d also like to remind you that in France, the term ‘lingerie’ refers to the entire field of underwear, including men, women and children. This term alone doesn’t have a sexy connotation.

And about the photos of my brand, I’d like to specify that the articles in which they appeared were taken out of their context and were laid out to imply a sexy dimension that didn’t originally exist. All the photos show children playing children’s games, as we’ve all done. If you look at the details, you’ll often find elements of children’s games: dolls accessories, wooden animals etc. A second reading is needed--no vulgar connotation. There is only one interpretation: children playing together, no more.

The children aren’t wearing high heels nor nail polish nor lipstick. The hairdos are over the top, but so are children’s games. Yes, the models wear sunglasses, like every single kid. Yes, you see their stomachs and legs, like you do on the beach. Yes they wear necklaces inside the house, as do all little girls for fun. And finally, all the girls are professionals models and not Lolitas trying on women’s outfits. The direction of the photos is nothing weird, it is one frequently used by brands and magazines’ photo shoots.

You’ll often see children’s productions inspired by the theme of cowboys and Indians—does this make children future criminals?

It is time to worry about serious problems, such as pornographic magazine exposed in kiosks on a daily basis, for every child to look at. [in France, press kiosks in the street are decorated with the covers of the weekly publications, including the current porno mags.]

The very dodgy interpretations made by the press come from the uproar around the photos of Veronika Loubry’s daughter, and from journalists looking for photos and content to fill their articles about this topic.

My brand has existed for two years, my company is extremely serious and I am taken seriously in the field of lingerie. My brand is present at many lingerie and children’s fashion tradeshows, and sold in internationally recognized boutiques.

At no point did Jours après Lunes meet any criticism, neither from other professionals in fashion, nor tradeshows organizers, nor from buyers or clients –who I thank for being loyal and trust me. And I’ve especially have had no issue with serious press, be it professional, French, international--Jours après Lunes has always been welcome with a smile.

And, I’d like to remind you that Jours après Lunes is absolutely not sold in the USA!!

Best regards,

Sophie Morin